Arader Galleries Archives - Rare Book Insider
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

Arader Galleries

placeholder

History of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties.

MASON, Jesse D.] 4to (11 3/4 x 9 in.; 29.9 x 22.9 cm). 2 title-pages with lithographed vignettes, 88 full-page lithographed plates (many with two or more views), 15 steel-engraved portrait plates of prominent men and pioneers with facsimile signatures, 20 lithographed text illustrations (all but one a portrait), cancel slip between pp. 358-359, 7-page chronology (1512-1882) and 7-page "Patrons Directory"; 2 portraits lacking tissue guards, marginal foxing to one plate, offsetting of 5 plates to text, short closed marginal tears to 2 plates, short tear along bottom of p. 453 touching 1-2 text lines, small stain in gutter of pp. 298-299. Publisher's quarter calf, purplish-brown pebbled cloth blocked in gilt on upper board, in blind on lower, marbled edges, an Oakland, California, binder's ticket on front pastedown; rehinged, extremities rubbed, ticket rubbed. (64F11B) FIRST EDITION, THE STANDARD AUTHORITY about the early years of American settlement in California, including, but not limited to pre-Spanish occupants, Spanish-Mexican occupancy, agriculture, husbandry, discovery of gold, county government, education, industry and politics. Since Ventura County was a part of Santa Barbara until 1872, this account includes a separate history of Ventura. The lithographs include striking views of grand Victorian residences and more modest homes and ranches, stores, hotels, banks, post offices, the Agency of Wells Fargo & Co., missions, mills, orchards, a vineyard, and feed and livery stables. One of the more outstanding views depicts the wharf at Carpentaria with a paddle steamboat. The "Patrons Directory" lists the names and residences of the early settlers, along with their occupations, places of origin, and acreage owned.
placeholder

Map of the United States with the Contiguous British & Spanish Possessions Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities.

MELISH, John (1771-1822) Map of the United States with the Contiguous British & Spanish Possessions Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. Philadelphia: John Melish, 1816 - A Geographical Description of the United States, with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, Intended as an Accompaniment to Melish's Map of these Countries. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE ENGRAVED MAP (36 x 58 ½ in; 91.4 x 148.6 cm) by J. Vallance and H.S. Tanner, with original handcoloring in outline, dissected into 40 segments and laid down on linen, green silk selvages, folds with marbled end sheets; some occasional pale spotting. Contemporary half red roan portfolio, marbled boards, linen ties; joints splitting but intact, minor losses to spine. GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION: 8vo (8 1/4 x 5 1/4 in.; 21 x 13.3 cm). 5 engraved maps (one folding and partially hand-colored), errata slip tipped to front free endpaper; scattered staining, mild text browning. Contemporary red roan over marbled boards, smooth spine lettered gilt; recased and recornered. (65B2E) THE FIRST AMERICAN-PRODUCED WALL MAP DEPICTING THE COUNTRY FROM COAST TO COAST. Apparently the fourth state, with Cadiz, Washington, Cambridge, Adelphi, Mansfield, and Wooster added in Ohio and "Vevay or" added before "Swiss Vineyards" in southeastern Indiana. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris. Incorporating data from state and military maps as these became available, Melish frequently revised and corrected the plates, limiting each printing to 100 copies (Schwartz & Ehrenberg, p. 238). New editions, in a total of 25 issues, of this map were published between 1818 and 1823. Melish outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 Geographical Description: "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." Second edition of the text, after the 1815 original and another similar but earlier 1816 issue without the designation of "second edition." It was designed to accompany Melish's large landmark map. Four of the maps are of the cities and adjacent areas: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore/Annapolis. The fifth map (folding and hand-colored) is a "Specimen of the County Maps to be Constructed by Virtue of an Act of the Legislature, Directing the Formation of a Map of Pennsylvania," and shows a stretch of the Susquehannah River with Harrisburg. REFERENCES: Clark II: 218; Howes M490; Martin/Ristow 24; Sabin 47431; Streeter VI:3798, Wheat, Transmississippi 322, pp.62-64
placeholder

Memoir Prepared at the Request of a Committee of the Common Council at the Celebration of the Completion of the New York Canals.

COLDEN, Cadwallader David (1769-1834). 4to (9 3/4 x 7 3/4 in.; 24.8 x 19.8 cm). 45 engraved and lithographed plates, including portraits (one after George Catlin), lithographed title to the appendix, 2 large folding hand-colored engraved maps, views (some folding), and an additional 8 facsimiles of testimonial letters; occasional offsetting, some spotting, closed tears to folding maps and views, some neatly repaired, occasional toning. Elaborate presentation binding ordered by the City of New York, bound by Wilson & Nichols, contemporary straight-grained bright crimson morocco, covers with broad elaborately gilt borders, upper cover gilt-lettered "Presented by the City of New York to Miss Rachel Ann Robertson, Jany. 1st 1827," spine with raised bands in six compartments, third and fifth gilt lettered, others with repeat overall decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; slight rubbing to extremities, minor soiling. [With:] An original silk ribbon badge by Asher B. Durand representing the alliance of Neptune and Pan or the Union of Erie with the Atlantic, and two elaborate engraved tickets (Miss Robertson's) to the celebration and a letter acknowledging Robertson's contribution to the volume, neatly laid in. (64F20E) A SUMPTUOUS SOUVENIR FROM THE OPENING OF THE ERIE CANAL IN A SPLENDID PRESENTATION BINDING. Though initially deemed "Clinton's Folly" when first proposed by Governor Dewitt Clinton, the Erie Canal "proved to be the key that unlocked an enormous series of social and economic changes in the young nation." The present work is one of the first books published in the U.S. to be extensively illustrated by lithography, and is the first book to contain an illustration by George Catlin. Rachel Ann Robertson, the 20-year-old daughter of artist Archibald Robertson, executed the plate facing page 380 from "The Students of Colombia College," "by a young Lady"; a letter laid into the text acknowledges her contribution to the celebratory volume. Other plates include views of the New York harbor crowded with shipping, maps of the waterways in the United States and New York State, badges and emblems of the societies of saddlers, house painters, chair-makers, rope-makers, and a series of fire engines. PROVENANCE: Rachel Ann Robertson (binding, and accompanying ribbon, tickets, and letter)- Jay T. Snider (bookplate on front pastedown and his sale, Christie's New York, 22 June 2005, lot 143) REFERENCES: Howes C-562; Peters, America on Stone, pp. 228-232; Shoemaker 20118; Voorsanger, Catherine and John K. Howat, Art and the Empire City, New York, 1825-1861 (2000) 117. Binding: Papantonio, Early American Bookbindings 47.
placeholder

North American Boundary. Map of that Portion of Her Majesty’s Colonies of New Brunswick and Lower Canada the Title to Which is Disputed by the Government of the United States to Accompany a Report of the Investigation of that Country.

GREAT BRITAIN. FOREIGN OFFICE Comprising 2 maps (cartographer: James D. Featherstonhaugh; engraver: James Wyld) of which: MAP A: Engraved folding map, dissected into 32 parts and mounted on linen, as issued (30 3/4 x 48 in.; 78.1 x 121.9 Cm), partially handcolored, edged in green cloth and backed in green paper; faint offsetting, two fold splits, centerfold strengthened. MAP B: "Referred to in the Report of Colonel Mudge and Mr. Featherstonhaugh, the Commissioners Appointed by the British Government to Explore and Survey the Territory in Dispute between Great Britain and the United States of America under the Second Article of the Treaty of 1783." 8 engraved maps each linen-mounted (total 19 1/2 x 30 3/4 in.; 49.5 x 78.1 cm), partially colored in outline, edged in green cloth, backed in green paper; light offsetting. Contemporary green cloth slipcase with printed label dated April, 1840; upper joints split at the top. FIRST EDITION. MAPPING OUT THE DIPLOMATIC END OF BORDER DISPUTES ALONG THE NORTHEAST BOUNDARY. Territorial encroachments initiated by Maine on British lands in Aroostook culminated in 1839 with the menacing encampment of 10,000 Maine troops on British borders. General Winfield Scott was sent by the federal government to negotiate a truce with the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick. Great Britain, now convinced of the gravity of the situation, authorized a boundary commission headed by Featherstonhaugh and Mudge. After they examined the territory in question and the whole history of the dispute, Featherstonhaugh and Mudge concluded that the line claimed by the United States was inconsistent with the physical geography of the country and terms of the Treaty. They had in fact discovered a line of highlands south of that claimed, which was in accordance with the terms of the Treaty. Their findings were incorporated into the Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1842) which allowed for free navigation of the St. John River and rectified the boundaries at the head of the Connecticut River and the north end of Lake Champlain. It also established details of the border between Lake Superior and Lake of the Woods and (as defined by the Treaty of Paris) and reaffirmed the location of the border at the 49th parallel in the western frontier up to the Rocky Mountains (as defined by the Treaty of 1818). The latter two specifics were necessary because of errors in the Mitchell map, which was used in the negotiations of the Treaty of Paris of 1783. PROVENANCE: Charles J. Tanebaum Collection of American Cartography, Sotheby's New York, 11 December 2008, lot 4. REFERENCES: Streeter sale 7:3706; Phillips, Maps, p. 603
placeholder

Map of the United States with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions. Entered.the 16th Day of June, 1820.

MELISH, John (1771-1822) Map of the United States with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions. Entered.the 16th Day of June, 1820. Philadelphia: John Melish, 1820 - A Geographical Description of the United States, with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, Intended as an Accompaniment to Melish's Map of these Countries. Large engraved folding map by J. Vallance and H.S. Tanner (43 ½ x 57 in.; 110.4 x 144.8 cm), dissected into 36 segments and mounted on linen, full contemporary handcoloring; fold separation affecting 3 segments, a few holes at interstices, faint offsetting and some toning. Contemporary green paste-paper board slipcase, manuscript label; extremities somewhat worn, loss of one side strip. GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION: Errata leaf tipped to front free endpaper, 4 engraved plans of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, handcolored folding engraved map being a "Specimen of the County Maps to be Constructed by Virtue of an Act of the Legislature, Directing the Formation of a Map of Pennsylvania" with 3 pages of instructions and prospectus for constructing state and country maps thereof, 12 pages of publisher's advertisements and endorsements; browned throughout, scattered stains on the full-page maps; short tear to County Map near mount. Marbled boards rather worn, rebacked, some restoration to red roan corners. (65B2E) The scarce 1820 edition, third state (Martin/Ristow), enlarged to include the West Indies and all of Mexico, with fine handcoloring and the original slipcase. Melish was the first publisher in the United States to specialize in geographical and cartographic works. First published in 1816, this was the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast. Melish frequently revised and corrected the plates. He published new editions in 1818 (five states), 1819 (two states), 1820 (eight states) 1822 (two states), and 1823 (one state). According to Streeter, who also owned two copies of the 1820 edition (6:3808 dated 6 June 1820 and 6:3809 dated 16 June 1820): "The obvious difference between the June 6th and June 16th maps is in the coloration. In the June 6th, as in all previous editions, states and territories appear outlined in color. In the June 16th edition, they are tinted throughout in the same color as the darker boundary colors." Melish has extended the southern boundary to include the Yucatan peninsula, as well as the Caribbean Islands. The northern boundary of Tennessee is shown along the parallel 36o30' following Congress's ratification of 12 May 1820. The depiction of Lake Michigan and the borders of Illinois and Indiana are also corrected to include Chicago within the Illinois state boundary. Missouri appears as a Territory separate from the Arkansas Territory. SCARCE: Only two copies of the third state have sold at auction in the last four decades which have appeared several times: the Streeter/Newman copy (2018) and the Charles J. Tanenbaum copy (2008) which was purchased at auction in 1977. The map is accompanied by the second, enlarged edition of A Geographical Description of the United States FROM THE LIBRARY OF JAMES BUCHANAN (1791-1868). REFERENCES: Map: Ristow, John Melish and His Map of the United States, p. 174; Streeter 6:3809. Text: Howes M490; Sabin 47431. PROVENANCE: Charles J. Tanenbaum, Collection of American Cartography (Sotheby's New York, 11 December 2008, lot 16); An anonymous consignor (Sotheby's New York, 25 January 1977, lot 82).
placeholder

Theatrum Imperii Magnae Britanniae [The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine] (trans. Philemon Holland).

Speed, John (1552-1629) Engraved title within architectural border, full-page engraved arms of James I, 63 (of 67) double-page engraved maps of England, Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, mostly by Jodocus Hondius and mounted on guards, full-page woodcut of Royal Arms (with repeats), woodcut initials, head-and tailpieces, double-column text within double rules; maps of Dorset, Lincoln, Suffolk and Warwick supplied in modern facsimile, lacks final 6 leaves of text, title and dedication with small loss of image to one corner, outer corners extended but extensions gradually diminishing in size in second half of the book, several margins strengthened (one resulting in creases). Bound in modern cloth retaining the early vellum upper cover. Cloth folding case. (64V1D) "THIS LATIN EDITION OF SPEED'S ATLAS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND IS EXTREMELY RARE" (Chubb). First published in English in 1606, Speed's Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine followed the model of Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarum in its title and its format, with map sheets backed by historical and geographical texts and gazetteers of place names. This was the one of the earliest attempts in England at producing an atlas on a grand scale, with the first detailed maps of Ireland, the first set of county maps consistently showing the boundaries of territorial divisions, and the first truly comprehensive set of English town plans-all notable contributions to British topography. Perhaps as many as fifty of the seventy-three towns had not been previously mapped, and about fifty-one of the plans were probably Speed's own work. Speed's son John may have helped him in surveying towns. One of the work's most significant contributions is the balance that was struck between the modern and historical, with information placed on the edges of the maps about antiquarian remains, sites and vignettes of famous battles, together with the arms of princes and nobles. Scotland is covered in less detail, as Scottish cartographer Timothy Pont was still in the process of surveying the country. Individual maps for the Theatre were prepared from about 1602, and plates were subsequently engraved by Jodocus Hondius, who was noted for his skill in decoration. George Humble was granted a privilege to print the Theatre for twenty-one years from 1608, and the Theatre and History were published together 1611-1612. An immediate success, three new editions and issues of each appeared in Speed's lifetime, including this Latin edition, and a miniature version was first published about 1619-1620. The maps in the Theatre became the basis for subsequent folio atlases until the mid-18th century. REFERENCES: Chubb XXIVa; ESTC S107575
placeholder

Texas: The Rise, Progress, and Prospects of the Republic of Texas.

KENNEDY, William (1799-1871) 2 volumes, 8vo (9 x 5 1/2 in.22.9 x 14 cm). 2 engraved folding maps: Arrowsmith's "Map of Texas" handcolored in outline, and Cheffin's "Map of the Republic of Texas and the Adjacent Territories," and 2 full-page maps; 3 small holes at fold intersections and short marginal tear at mount on Arrowsmith map, marginal finger soiling and discoloration to vol. 1 title-page. Publisher's brown cloth blocked in blind, spines lettered gilt, yellow-coated endpapers; vol. 1 text block sprung from casing and head of spine detached but present; extremities of vol. 2 lightly rubbed. Red cloth slipcase. (64F9D) FIRST EDITION, CONSIDERED THE SINGLE BEST AND MOST COMPREHENSIVE WORK ON TEXAS, AND EXTREMELY INFLUENTIAL IN ENCOURAGING EUROPEAN EMIGRATION TO THE REGION AND IN ESTABLISHING TEXAS AS AN INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE. Kennedy's compilation covers the geography and natural features of Texas as well as its history during the revolution and early years of the Republic, with many of the basic documents of the revolution also included. Its importance is also distinguished by the maps it contains. John Arrowsmith's"A Map of Texas, Compiled from Surveys Recorded in the Land Office of Texas, and Other Official Surveys" was one of the earliest to mark the towns, counties, military routes, rivers, creeks, and locations of various Indian tribes. It also features two inset maps being a plan of Galveston Bay and one of North America from lower Canada to Central America with Republic of Texas outlined in pink. According to Jenkins, it was apparently only included in a small number of the first edition. "Regarded as the best and most useful map of Texas at the time of its publication. The depiction of the western boundary of Texas as the Rio Grande as far north as its source reflects the popular notion of that period and helps to illustrate the rationale behind the ill-fated Santa Fe expedition. The map was widely copied, attested by the number of times Arrowsmith's errors in the Panhandle area describing that territory as well-wooded and watered were added to many later maps. Despite this mistake, the map is generally one of the best maps for the Republic period" (Amon Carter Museum, Crossroads of Empire: Early Printed Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900. p. 33). Cheffins' "Map of the Republic of Texas and the Adjacent Territories, Indicating the Grants of Land Conceded under the Empresario System of Mexico" shows Texas divided into land grants, including Stephen Austin's, and the southern border as the Nueces River. This contrasts with Arrowsmith who shows the southwest border of Texas at the Rio Grande. However, it is a detailed map that includes place locations for mines, forts, Droves of Wild Cattle & Horses, the Mustang or Wild Horse Desert, and the vast expanse of prairies. Kennedy, an Irishman by birth, was appointed by the by the Texas government as Texan Consul in London and later as British Consul at Galveston. In 1842 he obtained a contract to settle 600 families south of the Nueces, but the proposed colony was never realized. Kennedy returned to England in poor health in 1847 and retired on a pension in 1849. REFERENCES: Jenkins, Basic Texas Books 117; Eberstadt, Texas, 162:458; Graff 2308; Howes K92; Phillips, America, p. 843; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 451; Sabin 37440; Streeter 1385.
placeholder

An Atlas of England and Wales.

SAXTON, Christopher (ca. 1542-1610) Folio (17 1/2 x 12 in.; 44.5 x 30.5 cm). Letterpress index (fourth setting with 4-line heading and 3 columns), double-page engraved plate of coats of arms (total of 84 with one left blank) and table of counties with contemporary full hand-coloring, 35 double-page engraved plates (Yorkshire folding), after Saxton by Hogenberg, Lenaert Terwoort, Cornelis de Hooghe, Augustine Ryther, Francis Scatter, and Nicholas Reynolds, paper with the crossed sword watermark, maps of Northhamptonshire and Norfolk in the second state, 9 maps bearing Seckford's pre-1576 motto ("Pestis patriae pigricies") and 24 his later motto ("Industria naturam ornate"); extra-illustrated with 4 maps tipped in: Seller, "J. Buckinamiae comitatus vulgo Buckinghamshire" (London, 1733); Boazio, [Irlandiae accurata desciptio" London, 1599] (lefthand sheet only); Ortelius, "Eryn. Hiberniae Briannicae insulae" [Antwerp, 1584]; Ortelius, "Scotiae tabula" [Antwerp, c. 1582], all but 3 maps in FINE FULL CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLOR (Cornwall and additional map of Buckingham plain, Yorkshire in contemporary outline color). Lacking engraved frontispiece of patron and dedicatee Queen Elizabeth I, maps of Cornwall and Yorkshire replaced with maps from the Philip Lea edition of Saxton ca. 1689, some minor mostly marginal soiling, map of Norfolk browned, one or two early repairs to folds on verso. Contemporary limp vellum; stained, nearly detached, lacking leather ties. (64V1D) FIRST EDITION, THE MACCLESFIELD COPY WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLORING OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND EARLIEST ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES. The index has been annotated in a late 16th-century hand to include the additional maps of Ireland and Scotland, and with the same hand annotating the map of Cheshire to show Macclesfield, the map of Lancaster to show Harrington Park (owned by ancestors of the Stanley family). Map making became increasingly prevalent during the reign of Elizabeth I due to advances in surveying techniques and copperplate engraving. At the same time, state officials began to realize the political and administrative advantages of accurate maps. Among them was Elizabeth's shrewd chief advisor, William Cecil, Lord Burghley, who relentlessly tracked politically volatile areas such as the Anglo-Scottish border. He was instrumental in ensuring that court official Thomas Seckford financed the first comprehensive survey of the counties of England and Wales. In turn, Seckford commissioned Saxton to undertake the task of producing an atlas of England and Wales. All the maps bear Seckford's arms in tandem with the Royal Arms (with the exception of Norfolk which lacks the latter), thus reflecting his deep involvement in this monumental enterprise. For his part, Burghley retained proofs of all the maps, which are now housed at the British Library. Widely considered the father of British cartography, Christopher Saxton grew up in Yorkshire and received his early training in surveying from the local vicar, John Rudd. Begun in 1574, Saxton's survey produced its first map (Norfolk) that year. All the maps are dated between 1574 and 1578, with the exception of Northumberland (undated) and Anglia (dated 1579 and probably the last to be completed). Dutch and Flemish engravers were employed to produce fifteen of the maps with additional contributions by skilled English artisans. The main geographical features on the maps include detailed depictions of rivers, streams, hills and mountains, parks, and woodlands. Woods are shown by small tree symbols, with clusters representing forests. Parklands are enclosed with ring fences while a small building with a spire represents a village. In consideration of the work and expense involved, Queen Elizabeth, to whom the atlas is dedicated, granted Saxton a license in 1577 for the exclusive publication of the maps for a period of ten years. An unparalleled commercial success, the atlas formed the basis of English regional mapping for more than a century, prompting attempts at similar enterprises by cartographers such as John Speed, John Norton, Michael Drayton, and Philip Lea, who adapted and added to Saxton's magnum opus. PROVENANCE: Early annotations indicating ownership by the Stanley family, the Earls of Derby, and owners of Macclesfield Castle in the 16th century; The Earls of Macclesfield (19th century North Library bookplate on front pastedown dated 1860, discreet blind-stamp on first two pages; and sale, Sotheby's London, 15 March 2007, lot 3273).
placeholder

The Shires of England and Wales Described by Christopher Saxton: Being the Best and Original Mapps, with Many Additions and Corrections by Philip Lea.

SAXTON, Christopher (ca. 1542-1610) and LEA, Philip (d. 1700) Folio (18 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.; 46.5 x 31 cm). Engraved title-page, 38 double-page or folding regional and county maps handcolored in outline; the maps neatly numbered in manuscript on the title-page index, a few minor marginal tears and foxing or staining, some creases. Half calf over blue marbled boards, the spine in 6 compartments with raised bands, one with red morocco lettering piece, the others with repeat gilt decoration; upper board detached, small gash on front cover near joint, loss to head of spine, foot of spine torn, endpapers renewed, rubbing to extremities. (6.4V.1D) Of the 38 maps in this atlas, 29 show evidence of erasures of George Willdey's imprint in the cartouches. According to Evans & Lawrence, "Willdey's imprints have been erased [in the Jefferys 1749 edition], leaving many of the maps scarcely distinguishable from those of Lea's last edition in c. 1693 All Saxton's plates had reached their final state, cartographically, by c. 1693; alterations thereafter were minimal" (p. 58). The map of Cambridgeshire is by Jonas Moore, Hertfordshire by John Seller, Middlesex by John Ogilby and engraved by William Binneman, and the map of Devonshire was engraved by Francis Lamb. REFERENCES: Evans & Lawrence, Christopher Saxton, Elizabethan Map-maker, p. 58 PROVENANCE: Sotheby's New York, 11 December 2017, lot 337.
placeholder

An Atlas of England and Wales.

SAXTON, Christopher (c. 1542-1610) Folio (16 3/8 x 11 1/2 in.; 41.6 x 29.2 cm). Engraved frontispiece in contemporary handcoloring heightened in gold depicting an enthroned Queen Elizabeth I as the patron of Geography and Astronomy (Hind state II with the dress falling in folds between her knees) attributed to Remigius Hogenberg, letterpress index leaf (setting D), handcolored double-page engraved plate of coats of arms and a table of counties, 35 double-page engraved (Yorkshire folding) after Saxton by Hogenberg, Lenaert Terwoort, Cornelis de Hooghe, Augustine Ryther, Francis Scatter, and Nicholas Reynolds, ALL WITH CONTEMPORARY HANDCOLORING, most watermarked with a small bunch of grapes; minor marginal losses to frontispiece, index cut round and mounted, top margins of maps of Kent (Cantium) and Wilton shaved, Wilton also with tiny burnhole not significantly affecting map, minor marginal staining or foxing affecting approximately 6 maps, margins of Southampton and Devonshire somewhat tender and frayed. Eighteenth-century mottled calf, the spine gilt (one lettered) in seven compartments with raised bands; mottling oxidized. (64V1D) A MAGNIFICENT COPY WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLORING OF THE FIRST EDITION OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND EARLIEST ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES, THE DITCHLEY COPY. Map making became increasingly prevalent during the reign of Elizabeth I due to advances in surveying techniques and copperplate engraving. At the same time, state officials began to realize the political and administrative advantages of accurate maps. Among them was Elizabeth's shrewd chief advisor, William Cecil, Lord Burghley, who relentlessly tracked politically volatile areas such as the Anglo-Scottish border. He was instrumental in ensuring that court official Thomas Seckford financed the first comprehensive survey of the counties of England and Wales. In turn, Seckford commissioned Saxton to undertake the task of producing an atlas of England and Wales. All the maps bear Seckford's arms in tandem with the Royal Arms (with the exception of Norfolk which lacks the latter), thus reflecting his deep involvement in this monumental enterprise. For his part, Burghley retained proofs of all the maps, which are now housed at the British Library. Christopher Saxton grew up in Yorkshire and received his early training in surveying from the local vicar, John Rudd. Begun in 1574, Saxton's survey produced its first map (Norfolk) that year. All the maps are dated between 1574 and 1578, with the exception of Northumberland (undated) and Anglia (dated 1579 and probably the last to be completed). This copy has the coats of arms plate issued circa 1589, suggesting that it was printed about 1590 "when the atlas assumed its definitive form" (Skelton). Dutch and Flemish engravers were employed to produce fifteen of the maps with additional contributions by skilled English artisans. The main geographical features on the maps include detailed depictions of rivers, streams, hills and mountains, parks, and woodlands. Woods are shown by small tree symbols, with clusters representing forests. Parklands are enclosed with ring fences while a small building with a spire represents a village. In consideration of the work and expense involved, Queen Elizabeth, to whom the atlas is dedicated, granted Saxton a license in 1577 for the exclusive publication of the maps for a period of ten years. An unparalleled commercial success, the atlas formed the basis of English regional mapping for more than a century, prompting attempts at similar enterprises by cartographers such as John Speed, John Norton, Michael Drayton, and Philip Lea, who adapted and added to Saxton's magnum opus. REFERENCES: Chubb 1; ESTC S123137; Skelton 1 PROVENANCE: Ditchley bookplate on front pastedown dated 1903 (almost certainly that of Harold Lee-Dillon, 17th Viscount Dillon, 1844-1942. Dillon-Lee's family home was Ditchley, Oxfordshire, the estate originally purchased by his ancestor Sir Henry Lee, 1533-1611, who was the Queen's champion 1559-1590. He commissioned Marcus Gheeraerts' "Ditchley Portrait" of Elizabeth I, probably to commemorate a lavish entertainment he held at his estate for the Queen in September 1592. It depicts the Queen standing upon a cartographic image of Britain derived from the maps in Saxton's atlas, her foot placed in the county of Oxford. The portrait was bequeathed to the National Portrait Gallery in 1932, the year before Ditchley was sold. - Robert Theodore Gunther (1869-1940), founder of the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford (bookplate) - thence by family descent.
placeholder

NEW YORK CITY].

Hill, John William (1812-1879) Aquatint broadside (22 x 51 3/4 in.; 55.9 x 131.5 cm), being a view of the Brooklyn side of the East River, engraved by Sigismund Himley after John William Hill's 1852 painting, second state, captioned "Entered According to Act of Congress, in the Year 1855, by F. & G. Smith, in the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York Printed by McQueen, London. To the Citizens of New York this Picture is Most Respectfully Dedicated by the Publishers Paul & Dominic Colnaghi & Co., 13, & 14, Pall Mall East. Paris Fois delarue, Rue J. J. Rousseau 18"; large portion of upper sky trimmed, captions obscured, heavily restored particularly the margins and backed. Loosely laid down on sturdy card and enclosed in mylar. A SPLENDID VIEW OF NEW YORK CITY, depicting a seaport bustling with barks, brigantines, four-riggers, schooners, sloops, and steam packets. Taken from the Brooklyn side of the East River, the panorama extends across Manhattan Island to the Hudson and beyond to the New Jersey shore. In 1855, three years after Hill completed the painting his "skillfully integrated view of New York and its expansive harbor was deemed worthy to be translated into an aquatint. The promoters of this enterprise were the brothers Francis and George Warren Smith, who published the view. Sigismond Himely [sic], a native of Switzerland, was the printmaker they commissioned to execute the aquatint. Himely [sic] had acquired an expertise in aquatinting after he made his home in Paris. He also learned lithography and chromolithography, and has a large number of prints to his credit. REFERENCES: Deák 643
placeholder

Shipwreck Victims On Icefloe [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, in Magdalena-Bay (Spitzbergen)]

François-Auguste Biard (1798-1882) FRANÇOIS-AUGUSTE BIARD (FRENCH, 1798-1882) Shipwreck Victims On Icefloe [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, in Magdalena-Bay (Spitzbergen)] Oil on canvas. Signed and dated lower right Biard 1876 - 1877 Inscription on the verso: .Les Naufragés du Spitzberg.Canvas size: 49 x 77 3/8 in. Provenance: Private collection, France. Purchased by the current owner’s father in the 1930s. Exhibitions: Probably, Salon, Paris, 1877 titled Les Naufragés de la Lucie-Marguerite, Vue prise à Magdalena-Bay (Spitzberg), par le 80e degré de latitude Nord (Souvenir du voyage de l’auteur au Pôle Nord en 1839 à bord de la corvette La Recherche). A monumental canvas of Magdalena Bay, with its chain of white mountains, by French genre painter François- Auguste Biard. This is an exceptional example of Biard’s ability to portray both the dramatic landscape and beauty of meteorological events in the Arctic. The artist first exhibited this work at the 1877 Salon as Les Naufragés de la Lucie-Marguerite, Vue prise à Magdalena-Bay (Spitzberg) [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, View taken in Magdalena- Bay (Spitzbergen)]. It is a very fine example of the artist’s lasting passion for Arctic, as well as the public’s continued interest for these romantic scenes untouched by mankind. François-Auguste Biard painted several compositions of the Arctic following an expedition there in 1843. Our painting, executed in 1876-77, illustrates an event that took place in 1843, as indicated in the title at the Salon. The left portion of the composition shows a beautiful aurora borealis. This phenomenon captures the spectator’s entire attention at first, before they discover the shipwreck on the right of the composition. On the right, the castaways on a rocky precipice try desperately to gain the attention of a boat in the background. The wreck seems a result of a failed sealing expedition, indicated by the iron hooked sealing gaff strewn alongside lifeless seals on the icy shore in the lower right corner of the composition. The situation is clearly dire, a kneeling man raises his arms like child begging to be lifted, several passengers are injured and carried by fellow crew members, one has died and is mourned by a man sitting and covering his head with his hands in despair, those that are able bodied try to keep the fire burning, while others wave flares, hats, and wreckage to grab the attention of the passing ship. Biard’s fascination for grand landscapes goes back to the journeys he made in Switzerland and Scotland in the 1830s. His first painting with and Arctic theme: Embarcation attaquée par des ours blancs, was completed in 1839, before his trip to the High North. The painting was admired by Louis-Philippe at the 1839 Salon, he suggested the artist go with the scientific mission soon leaving for Spitzberg. Biard happily accepted the invitation which indulged his ardor for risk and for long journeys, he took his future wife, Léonie d’Aunet. After 14 days at sea on the ship La Recherche, the mission finally arrived in Magdalena Bay. The crew spent 13 days there, after which Biard and Léonie continued their voyage to Lapland. Biard was amazed by the variety and the splendor of the landscape and skies, as well as the impressive aurora borealis and other meteorological manifestations. Upon his return in Paris, Biard painted a series of 18 studies showing Magdalena Bay and its aurora borealis. His vivid memories along with these studies inspired a dozen of paintings which he presented at the Salon between 1841 and 1880. The first paintings, more romantic, emphasized human frailty before the immense ice desert. The most famous being Magdalena Bay, vue prise de la presqu’île des Tombeaux au nord du Spitzberg, presented in 1841 and now kept at the Musée du Louvre, Paris. The Louvre composition is similar to our own in that it concentrates on a shipwreck lost in a large landscape surrounded by snow and mountains, under an exquisite aurora borealis. He continued this theme for his painted decoration in the Galerie de minéralogie in the Museum of Natural History, Paris: a 360° panorama showing Magdalena Bay, open to the public in 1864.
placeholder

Carta Particular de las Cóstas Setentrionales del Seno Mexicano que Comprehende las de la Florida Ocidental las Margenes de la Luisiana y toda la rivera que sigue por la Bahia de S. Bernardo y el Rio Bravo del Norte hasta la Laguna Madre.

GULF OF MEXICO]. Direccion Hidrografica de Madrid (publisher) Broadsheet (26 1/4 x 39 in.; 66.7 x 99.1 cm) on wove paper watermarked " Grimaud/Garcoles," large engraved chart of the northern coastline of the Gulf of Mexico from Cape San Blas on the Gulf coast of Florida to Laguna Madre on the Mexican coast, engraved by Ferdinand Selma after cartographers M. Moreno and J. Morata, wide margins retaining the deckle edges; minor marginal spotting with a few neatly closed tears, IN A REMARKABLE STATE OF PRESERVATION. Loosely laid down on sturdy card and enclosed in mylar. (65B2G) FIRST EDITION OF THE LARGE-SCALE PRINTED CHART OF THE GULF COAST, based on actual soundings and explorations. It was published separately, as here, on the eve of Mexico's fight for independence from Spain, as well as in the "Atlas Maritimo Espanol" (map no. 23 ). Based on "Carta Esferica que comprehende las cóstas del Seno Mexicano" (Madrid, 1799), this chart delineates the Texas coast between the Mississippi and the Rio Grande on a larger scale and with slight revisions. Like the 1799 map, the Carta particular was an improvement over the Jefferys map, which it superseded. It shows the mouth and lower courses of six of the seven most important rivers of Texas. "Here the river entering Galveston Bay is correctly named R. de la Trinidad, instead of R. Archisas, and there is still no Brazos River" (Streeter). "Detailed soundings of all the coastal waterways were given. The Sabine River is shown as the boundary between Texas and Louisiana. The chart is by no means perfect in spite of relatively minor errors the continued significance of the map was perhaps best indicated by the fact that nearly twenty years later, in 1825, the first president of the new Republic of Mexico, Guadalupe Victoria, ordered an exact copy printed and distributed" (Martin & Martin). The Dirección de Hidrofgrafia, or the Directorate of Hydrographic Works, was established in 1797. Its roots were in the Casa de Contratación, founded in 1503 in Seville, which housed all the charts of the Spanish Empire and oversaw the creation and maintenance of the padrón real, the official master chart. The Casa, now in Cadiz, was shuttered in 1790, but Spain still needed a hydrographic agency. As a result, the Dirección was created in 1797. One of its first projects was the publication of charts from the Malaspina Expedition (1789-1794). The present chart is scarce, Streeter recorded copies in the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library (as part of the Atlas), the British Library, and his own copy. Worldcat additionally locates copies at Baylor University and the University of Texas at Arlington, and copies at two other continental libraries. In the past thirty years, fewer than a dozen have surfaced at auction or in the trade. REFERENCES: Lowery 744; Martin & Martin, 22B; Phillips, Atlases 4155; Streeter, Bibliography of Texas, Part III, Vol. 1: 1041, cf. 1029 (Carta Esferica, 1799).
The North American Sylva

The North American Sylva, or a Description of the Forest Trees of the United States, Canada, and Nova Scotia.

MICHAUX, François André (1746-1802) 3 volumes, 8vo (10 x 6 1/2 in.; 25.4 x 16.4). Half-titles, 155 (of 156) color-printed stipple-engraved plates finished by hand after P.J. Redouté, P. Bessa, H.J. Redouté, and others. CONDITION/BINDING: Lacking plate [135] "Stone Pine," light scattered foxing throughout, faint text offsetting to about 20 plates, plate 10 in vol. 3 stained. Contemporary dappled calf, elaborate gilt border, smooth spines gilt with red morocco lettering and numbering pieces, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; rebacked with original spines laid down, corners bumped with a few repaired, covers slightly scuffed. (65) FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH, in part a translation of Michaux's Histoire des arbres forestiers de l'Amérique septentrionale, published in Paris 1810-1813. "Michaux offered his readers 'an acquaintance with the properties of the American plants and with the uses of the forest trees' rather than 'the progress of botanical knowledge, and the embellishment of European gardens,' which had been the main aims of several earlier botanical explorers in America. "His work, based on the collections and travels made by his father as well as himself, remained the standard book on American trees until Charles Singer Sargent's Silva of North America was published from 1891 to 1902 (Raphael, p. 69). PROVENANCE: Sir James Wright (armorial bookplate on front pastedowns); A.J. Pierrepont (faint pencil inscription dated 1911 on front flyleaf of vol. 1); Swann Galleries, 6 June 2019, lot 314. REFERENCES: Bennett p. 76; Nissen, BBI 1361; Raphael, An Oak Spring Sylva 20; Reese, Stamped with a National Character 21; Sabin 48695; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 5962.
placeholder

The Landscape Album. Picturesque Views of American Scenery.

SHAW, Joshua (1776-1860) 10 (of 20) fine handcolored aquatint plates (13 1/2 x 16 3/4 in.; 34.3 x 42.5 cm) by John Hill after Joshua Shaw, including pictorial title-page, paper watermarked J.M. WILCOX from the Ash edition, and one handcolored aquatint plate (13 3/8 x 16 3/4 in.; 33.9 x 42.5 cm) of the Monument Near West Point by John Hill after Joshua Shaw bearing the imprint of Mathew Carey. CONDITION/BINDING: Plates toned, upper and lower margins somewhat frayed; minor losses to upper corners of the Carey print, with some soiling and toning. Each matted (except the Carey print) separately and housed in an archival box, together with the original marbled boards (encapsulated). (65B1H) Essentially a reissue of plates from the original 1820 edition by Mathew Carey in Philadelphia. Familiarly known as "The Landscape Album," this appealing portfolio of scenery was the inspired vision of Joshua Shaw, an accomplished British landscape painter whose idyllic pictures were regularly exhibited at the Royal Academy and the British Institute. In 1817, bearing a letter of warm introduction from Benjamin West, Shaw emigrated to America where he would play a seminal role in the development of the Hudson River School of landscape painting. Once settled, Shaw began to explore the rural areas of the northeast whose raw, powerful beauty of the untamed countryside thrilled his senses and imagination. He was baffled by the fact that few artists on either side of the Atlantic regarded American scenery as a subject of painterly merit. Shaw set about the task of converting the indifferent public perception of the picturesque by traveling "through the different states for the purpose of taking on the spot, the best and most popular views " He envisioned publishing his sketches as a series of some 36 scenic prints and occasional vignettes to be issued in six numbers by subscription. The Philadelphia publisher Thomas Moses first undertook the ambitious project in 1819 but relinquished control to Mathew Carey the following year. For lack of subscribers, the publication foundered after only 20 prints had been produced. Yet, his contemplative and atmospheric style was enthusiastically embraced by the Hudson River School, whose landscapes would be in strong demand from the mid-1820s well into the 1880s. Popular interest revived as well in Shaw's portfolio which Ash reprinted in 1835, according to the bibliographical consensus. In addition to the original vignette of the Monument near West Point, this set contains ten of the plates reissued with Ash's imprint: the pictorial title-page; Washington's Sepulchre Mount Vernon; Falls of St. Anthony on the Mississippi; Burning of Savannah; Norfolk from Gosport, Virginia; Passaic Falls, New Jersey; View of the North River; Hell Gate, Near New York; Oyster Cove; and Passaic River, Below the Falls. The Ash reissue is equally as rare as the Carey edition: it is not recorded in NUC or Worldcat. Deák does however mention a complete, uncolored set of the unbound portfolio at the New York Public Library. REFERENCES: cf. Deák 315; Stauffer 1343; Stokes III. Pl. 87a; not in Sabin or Bennett. PROVENANCE: Skinner Auctions, 8-16 May 2019, lot 256.