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An Atlas of England and Wales.

SAXTON, Christopher (ca. 1542-1610) Folio (17 1/2 x 12 in.; 44.5 x 30.5 cm). Letterpress index (fourth setting with 4-line heading and 3 columns), double-page engraved plate of coats of arms (total of 84 with one left blank) and table of counties with contemporary full hand-coloring, 35 double-page engraved plates (Yorkshire folding), after Saxton by Hogenberg, Lenaert Terwoort, Cornelis de Hooghe, Augustine Ryther, Francis Scatter, and Nicholas Reynolds, paper with the crossed sword watermark, maps of Northhamptonshire and Norfolk in the second state, 9 maps bearing Seckford's pre-1576 motto ("Pestis patriae pigricies") and 24 his later motto ("Industria naturam ornate"); extra-illustrated with 4 maps tipped in: Seller, "J. Buckinamiae comitatus vulgo Buckinghamshire" (London, 1733); Boazio, [Irlandiae accurata desciptio" London, 1599] (lefthand sheet only); Ortelius, "Eryn. Hiberniae Briannicae insulae" [Antwerp, 1584]; Ortelius, "Scotiae tabula" [Antwerp, c. 1582], all but 3 maps in FINE FULL CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLOR (Cornwall and additional map of Buckingham plain, Yorkshire in contemporary outline color). Lacking engraved frontispiece of patron and dedicatee Queen Elizabeth I, maps of Cornwall and Yorkshire replaced with maps from the Philip Lea edition of Saxton ca. 1689, some minor mostly marginal soiling, map of Norfolk browned, one or two early repairs to folds on verso. Contemporary limp vellum; stained, nearly detached, lacking leather ties. (64V1D) FIRST EDITION, THE MACCLESFIELD COPY WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLORING OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND EARLIEST ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES. The index has been annotated in a late 16th-century hand to include the additional maps of Ireland and Scotland, and with the same hand annotating the map of Cheshire to show Macclesfield, the map of Lancaster to show Harrington Park (owned by ancestors of the Stanley family). Map making became increasingly prevalent during the reign of Elizabeth I due to advances in surveying techniques and copperplate engraving. At the same time, state officials began to realize the political and administrative advantages of accurate maps. Among them was Elizabeth's shrewd chief advisor, William Cecil, Lord Burghley, who relentlessly tracked politically volatile areas such as the Anglo-Scottish border. He was instrumental in ensuring that court official Thomas Seckford financed the first comprehensive survey of the counties of England and Wales. In turn, Seckford commissioned Saxton to undertake the task of producing an atlas of England and Wales. All the maps bear Seckford's arms in tandem with the Royal Arms (with the exception of Norfolk which lacks the latter), thus reflecting his deep involvement in this monumental enterprise. For his part, Burghley retained proofs of all the maps, which are now housed at the British Library. Widely considered the father of British cartography, Christopher Saxton grew up in Yorkshire and received his early training in surveying from the local vicar, John Rudd. Begun in 1574, Saxton's survey produced its first map (Norfolk) that year. All the maps are dated between 1574 and 1578, with the exception of Northumberland (undated) and Anglia (dated 1579 and probably the last to be completed). Dutch and Flemish engravers were employed to produce fifteen of the maps with additional contributions by skilled English artisans. The main geographical features on the maps include detailed depictions of rivers, streams, hills and mountains, parks, and woodlands. Woods are shown by small tree symbols, with clusters representing forests. Parklands are enclosed with ring fences while a small building with a spire represents a village. In consideration of the work and expense involved, Queen Elizabeth, to whom the atlas is dedicated, granted Saxton a license in 1577 for the exclusive publication of the maps for a period of ten years. An unparalleled commercial success, the atlas formed the basis of English regional mapping for more than a century, prompting attempts at similar enterprises by cartographers such as John Speed, John Norton, Michael Drayton, and Philip Lea, who adapted and added to Saxton's magnum opus. PROVENANCE: Early annotations indicating ownership by the Stanley family, the Earls of Derby, and owners of Macclesfield Castle in the 16th century; The Earls of Macclesfield (19th century North Library bookplate on front pastedown dated 1860, discreet blind-stamp on first two pages; and sale, Sotheby's London, 15 March 2007, lot 3273).
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The Shires of England and Wales Described by Christopher Saxton: Being the Best and Original Mapps, with Many Additions and Corrections by Philip Lea.

SAXTON, Christopher (ca. 1542-1610) and LEA, Philip (d. 1700) Folio (18 1/4 x 12 1/4 in.; 46.5 x 31 cm). Engraved title-page, 38 double-page or folding regional and county maps handcolored in outline; the maps neatly numbered in manuscript on the title-page index, a few minor marginal tears and foxing or staining, some creases. Half calf over blue marbled boards, the spine in 6 compartments with raised bands, one with red morocco lettering piece, the others with repeat gilt decoration; upper board detached, small gash on front cover near joint, loss to head of spine, foot of spine torn, endpapers renewed, rubbing to extremities. (6.4V.1D) Of the 38 maps in this atlas, 29 show evidence of erasures of George Willdey's imprint in the cartouches. According to Evans & Lawrence, "Willdey's imprints have been erased [in the Jefferys 1749 edition], leaving many of the maps scarcely distinguishable from those of Lea's last edition in c. 1693 All Saxton's plates had reached their final state, cartographically, by c. 1693; alterations thereafter were minimal" (p. 58). The map of Cambridgeshire is by Jonas Moore, Hertfordshire by John Seller, Middlesex by John Ogilby and engraved by William Binneman, and the map of Devonshire was engraved by Francis Lamb. REFERENCES: Evans & Lawrence, Christopher Saxton, Elizabethan Map-maker, p. 58 PROVENANCE: Sotheby's New York, 11 December 2017, lot 337.
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An Atlas of England and Wales.

SAXTON, Christopher (c. 1542-1610) Folio (16 3/8 x 11 1/2 in.; 41.6 x 29.2 cm). Engraved frontispiece in contemporary handcoloring heightened in gold depicting an enthroned Queen Elizabeth I as the patron of Geography and Astronomy (Hind state II with the dress falling in folds between her knees) attributed to Remigius Hogenberg, letterpress index leaf (setting D), handcolored double-page engraved plate of coats of arms and a table of counties, 35 double-page engraved (Yorkshire folding) after Saxton by Hogenberg, Lenaert Terwoort, Cornelis de Hooghe, Augustine Ryther, Francis Scatter, and Nicholas Reynolds, ALL WITH CONTEMPORARY HANDCOLORING, most watermarked with a small bunch of grapes; minor marginal losses to frontispiece, index cut round and mounted, top margins of maps of Kent (Cantium) and Wilton shaved, Wilton also with tiny burnhole not significantly affecting map, minor marginal staining or foxing affecting approximately 6 maps, margins of Southampton and Devonshire somewhat tender and frayed. Eighteenth-century mottled calf, the spine gilt (one lettered) in seven compartments with raised bands; mottling oxidized. (64V1D) A MAGNIFICENT COPY WITH CONTEMPORARY HAND-COLORING OF THE FIRST EDITION OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND EARLIEST ATLAS OF ENGLAND AND WALES, THE DITCHLEY COPY. Map making became increasingly prevalent during the reign of Elizabeth I due to advances in surveying techniques and copperplate engraving. At the same time, state officials began to realize the political and administrative advantages of accurate maps. Among them was Elizabeth's shrewd chief advisor, William Cecil, Lord Burghley, who relentlessly tracked politically volatile areas such as the Anglo-Scottish border. He was instrumental in ensuring that court official Thomas Seckford financed the first comprehensive survey of the counties of England and Wales. In turn, Seckford commissioned Saxton to undertake the task of producing an atlas of England and Wales. All the maps bear Seckford's arms in tandem with the Royal Arms (with the exception of Norfolk which lacks the latter), thus reflecting his deep involvement in this monumental enterprise. For his part, Burghley retained proofs of all the maps, which are now housed at the British Library. Christopher Saxton grew up in Yorkshire and received his early training in surveying from the local vicar, John Rudd. Begun in 1574, Saxton's survey produced its first map (Norfolk) that year. All the maps are dated between 1574 and 1578, with the exception of Northumberland (undated) and Anglia (dated 1579 and probably the last to be completed). This copy has the coats of arms plate issued circa 1589, suggesting that it was printed about 1590 "when the atlas assumed its definitive form" (Skelton). Dutch and Flemish engravers were employed to produce fifteen of the maps with additional contributions by skilled English artisans. The main geographical features on the maps include detailed depictions of rivers, streams, hills and mountains, parks, and woodlands. Woods are shown by small tree symbols, with clusters representing forests. Parklands are enclosed with ring fences while a small building with a spire represents a village. In consideration of the work and expense involved, Queen Elizabeth, to whom the atlas is dedicated, granted Saxton a license in 1577 for the exclusive publication of the maps for a period of ten years. An unparalleled commercial success, the atlas formed the basis of English regional mapping for more than a century, prompting attempts at similar enterprises by cartographers such as John Speed, John Norton, Michael Drayton, and Philip Lea, who adapted and added to Saxton's magnum opus. REFERENCES: Chubb 1; ESTC S123137; Skelton 1 PROVENANCE: Ditchley bookplate on front pastedown dated 1903 (almost certainly that of Harold Lee-Dillon, 17th Viscount Dillon, 1844-1942. Dillon-Lee's family home was Ditchley, Oxfordshire, the estate originally purchased by his ancestor Sir Henry Lee, 1533-1611, who was the Queen's champion 1559-1590. He commissioned Marcus Gheeraerts' "Ditchley Portrait" of Elizabeth I, probably to commemorate a lavish entertainment he held at his estate for the Queen in September 1592. It depicts the Queen standing upon a cartographic image of Britain derived from the maps in Saxton's atlas, her foot placed in the county of Oxford. The portrait was bequeathed to the National Portrait Gallery in 1932, the year before Ditchley was sold. - Robert Theodore Gunther (1869-1940), founder of the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford (bookplate) - thence by family descent.
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NEW YORK CITY].

Hill, John William (1812-1879) Aquatint broadside (22 x 51 3/4 in.; 55.9 x 131.5 cm), being a view of the Brooklyn side of the East River, engraved by Sigismund Himley after John William Hill's 1852 painting, second state, captioned "Entered According to Act of Congress, in the Year 1855, by F. & G. Smith, in the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York Printed by McQueen, London. To the Citizens of New York this Picture is Most Respectfully Dedicated by the Publishers Paul & Dominic Colnaghi & Co., 13, & 14, Pall Mall East. Paris Fois delarue, Rue J. J. Rousseau 18"; large portion of upper sky trimmed, captions obscured, heavily restored particularly the margins and backed. Loosely laid down on sturdy card and enclosed in mylar. A SPLENDID VIEW OF NEW YORK CITY, depicting a seaport bustling with barks, brigantines, four-riggers, schooners, sloops, and steam packets. Taken from the Brooklyn side of the East River, the panorama extends across Manhattan Island to the Hudson and beyond to the New Jersey shore. In 1855, three years after Hill completed the painting his "skillfully integrated view of New York and its expansive harbor was deemed worthy to be translated into an aquatint. The promoters of this enterprise were the brothers Francis and George Warren Smith, who published the view. Sigismond Himely [sic], a native of Switzerland, was the printmaker they commissioned to execute the aquatint. Himely [sic] had acquired an expertise in aquatinting after he made his home in Paris. He also learned lithography and chromolithography, and has a large number of prints to his credit. REFERENCES: Deák 643
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Shipwreck Victims On Icefloe [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, in Magdalena-Bay (Spitzbergen)]

François-Auguste Biard (1798-1882) FRANÇOIS-AUGUSTE BIARD (FRENCH, 1798-1882) Shipwreck Victims On Icefloe [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, in Magdalena-Bay (Spitzbergen)] Oil on canvas. Signed and dated lower right Biard 1876 - 1877 Inscription on the verso: .Les Naufragés du Spitzberg.Canvas size: 49 x 77 3/8 in. Provenance: Private collection, France. Purchased by the current owner’s father in the 1930s. Exhibitions: Probably, Salon, Paris, 1877 titled Les Naufragés de la Lucie-Marguerite, Vue prise à Magdalena-Bay (Spitzberg), par le 80e degré de latitude Nord (Souvenir du voyage de l’auteur au Pôle Nord en 1839 à bord de la corvette La Recherche). A monumental canvas of Magdalena Bay, with its chain of white mountains, by French genre painter François- Auguste Biard. This is an exceptional example of Biard’s ability to portray both the dramatic landscape and beauty of meteorological events in the Arctic. The artist first exhibited this work at the 1877 Salon as Les Naufragés de la Lucie-Marguerite, Vue prise à Magdalena-Bay (Spitzberg) [The Castaways of the Lucie-Marguerite, View taken in Magdalena- Bay (Spitzbergen)]. It is a very fine example of the artist’s lasting passion for Arctic, as well as the public’s continued interest for these romantic scenes untouched by mankind. François-Auguste Biard painted several compositions of the Arctic following an expedition there in 1843. Our painting, executed in 1876-77, illustrates an event that took place in 1843, as indicated in the title at the Salon. The left portion of the composition shows a beautiful aurora borealis. This phenomenon captures the spectator’s entire attention at first, before they discover the shipwreck on the right of the composition. On the right, the castaways on a rocky precipice try desperately to gain the attention of a boat in the background. The wreck seems a result of a failed sealing expedition, indicated by the iron hooked sealing gaff strewn alongside lifeless seals on the icy shore in the lower right corner of the composition. The situation is clearly dire, a kneeling man raises his arms like child begging to be lifted, several passengers are injured and carried by fellow crew members, one has died and is mourned by a man sitting and covering his head with his hands in despair, those that are able bodied try to keep the fire burning, while others wave flares, hats, and wreckage to grab the attention of the passing ship. Biard’s fascination for grand landscapes goes back to the journeys he made in Switzerland and Scotland in the 1830s. His first painting with and Arctic theme: Embarcation attaquée par des ours blancs, was completed in 1839, before his trip to the High North. The painting was admired by Louis-Philippe at the 1839 Salon, he suggested the artist go with the scientific mission soon leaving for Spitzberg. Biard happily accepted the invitation which indulged his ardor for risk and for long journeys, he took his future wife, Léonie d’Aunet. After 14 days at sea on the ship La Recherche, the mission finally arrived in Magdalena Bay. The crew spent 13 days there, after which Biard and Léonie continued their voyage to Lapland. Biard was amazed by the variety and the splendor of the landscape and skies, as well as the impressive aurora borealis and other meteorological manifestations. Upon his return in Paris, Biard painted a series of 18 studies showing Magdalena Bay and its aurora borealis. His vivid memories along with these studies inspired a dozen of paintings which he presented at the Salon between 1841 and 1880. The first paintings, more romantic, emphasized human frailty before the immense ice desert. The most famous being Magdalena Bay, vue prise de la presqu’île des Tombeaux au nord du Spitzberg, presented in 1841 and now kept at the Musée du Louvre, Paris. The Louvre composition is similar to our own in that it concentrates on a shipwreck lost in a large landscape surrounded by snow and mountains, under an exquisite aurora borealis. He continued this theme for his painted decoration in the Galerie de minéralogie in the Museum of Natural History, Paris: a 360° panorama showing Magdalena Bay, open to the public in 1864.
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Carta Particular de las Cóstas Setentrionales del Seno Mexicano que Comprehende las de la Florida Ocidental las Margenes de la Luisiana y toda la rivera que sigue por la Bahia de S. Bernardo y el Rio Bravo del Norte hasta la Laguna Madre.

GULF OF MEXICO]. Direccion Hidrografica de Madrid (publisher) Broadsheet (26 1/4 x 39 in.; 66.7 x 99.1 cm) on wove paper watermarked " Grimaud/Garcoles," large engraved chart of the northern coastline of the Gulf of Mexico from Cape San Blas on the Gulf coast of Florida to Laguna Madre on the Mexican coast, engraved by Ferdinand Selma after cartographers M. Moreno and J. Morata, wide margins retaining the deckle edges; minor marginal spotting with a few neatly closed tears, IN A REMARKABLE STATE OF PRESERVATION. Loosely laid down on sturdy card and enclosed in mylar. (65B2G) FIRST EDITION OF THE LARGE-SCALE PRINTED CHART OF THE GULF COAST, based on actual soundings and explorations. It was published separately, as here, on the eve of Mexico's fight for independence from Spain, as well as in the "Atlas Maritimo Espanol" (map no. 23 ). Based on "Carta Esferica que comprehende las cóstas del Seno Mexicano" (Madrid, 1799), this chart delineates the Texas coast between the Mississippi and the Rio Grande on a larger scale and with slight revisions. Like the 1799 map, the Carta particular was an improvement over the Jefferys map, which it superseded. It shows the mouth and lower courses of six of the seven most important rivers of Texas. "Here the river entering Galveston Bay is correctly named R. de la Trinidad, instead of R. Archisas, and there is still no Brazos River" (Streeter). "Detailed soundings of all the coastal waterways were given. The Sabine River is shown as the boundary between Texas and Louisiana. The chart is by no means perfect in spite of relatively minor errors the continued significance of the map was perhaps best indicated by the fact that nearly twenty years later, in 1825, the first president of the new Republic of Mexico, Guadalupe Victoria, ordered an exact copy printed and distributed" (Martin & Martin). The Dirección de Hidrofgrafia, or the Directorate of Hydrographic Works, was established in 1797. Its roots were in the Casa de Contratación, founded in 1503 in Seville, which housed all the charts of the Spanish Empire and oversaw the creation and maintenance of the padrón real, the official master chart. The Casa, now in Cadiz, was shuttered in 1790, but Spain still needed a hydrographic agency. As a result, the Dirección was created in 1797. One of its first projects was the publication of charts from the Malaspina Expedition (1789-1794). The present chart is scarce, Streeter recorded copies in the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library (as part of the Atlas), the British Library, and his own copy. Worldcat additionally locates copies at Baylor University and the University of Texas at Arlington, and copies at two other continental libraries. In the past thirty years, fewer than a dozen have surfaced at auction or in the trade. REFERENCES: Lowery 744; Martin & Martin, 22B; Phillips, Atlases 4155; Streeter, Bibliography of Texas, Part III, Vol. 1: 1041, cf. 1029 (Carta Esferica, 1799).
The North American Sylva

The North American Sylva, or a Description of the Forest Trees of the United States, Canada, and Nova Scotia.

MICHAUX, François André (1746-1802) 3 volumes, 8vo (10 x 6 1/2 in.; 25.4 x 16.4). Half-titles, 155 (of 156) color-printed stipple-engraved plates finished by hand after P.J. Redouté, P. Bessa, H.J. Redouté, and others. CONDITION/BINDING: Lacking plate [135] "Stone Pine," light scattered foxing throughout, faint text offsetting to about 20 plates, plate 10 in vol. 3 stained. Contemporary dappled calf, elaborate gilt border, smooth spines gilt with red morocco lettering and numbering pieces, marbled endpapers, edges gilt; rebacked with original spines laid down, corners bumped with a few repaired, covers slightly scuffed. (65) FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH, in part a translation of Michaux's Histoire des arbres forestiers de l'Amérique septentrionale, published in Paris 1810-1813. "Michaux offered his readers 'an acquaintance with the properties of the American plants and with the uses of the forest trees' rather than 'the progress of botanical knowledge, and the embellishment of European gardens,' which had been the main aims of several earlier botanical explorers in America. "His work, based on the collections and travels made by his father as well as himself, remained the standard book on American trees until Charles Singer Sargent's Silva of North America was published from 1891 to 1902 (Raphael, p. 69). PROVENANCE: Sir James Wright (armorial bookplate on front pastedowns); A.J. Pierrepont (faint pencil inscription dated 1911 on front flyleaf of vol. 1); Swann Galleries, 6 June 2019, lot 314. REFERENCES: Bennett p. 76; Nissen, BBI 1361; Raphael, An Oak Spring Sylva 20; Reese, Stamped with a National Character 21; Sabin 48695; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 5962.
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The Landscape Album. Picturesque Views of American Scenery.

SHAW, Joshua (1776-1860) 10 (of 20) fine handcolored aquatint plates (13 1/2 x 16 3/4 in.; 34.3 x 42.5 cm) by John Hill after Joshua Shaw, including pictorial title-page, paper watermarked J.M. WILCOX from the Ash edition, and one handcolored aquatint plate (13 3/8 x 16 3/4 in.; 33.9 x 42.5 cm) of the Monument Near West Point by John Hill after Joshua Shaw bearing the imprint of Mathew Carey. CONDITION/BINDING: Plates toned, upper and lower margins somewhat frayed; minor losses to upper corners of the Carey print, with some soiling and toning. Each matted (except the Carey print) separately and housed in an archival box, together with the original marbled boards (encapsulated). (65B1H) Essentially a reissue of plates from the original 1820 edition by Mathew Carey in Philadelphia. Familiarly known as "The Landscape Album," this appealing portfolio of scenery was the inspired vision of Joshua Shaw, an accomplished British landscape painter whose idyllic pictures were regularly exhibited at the Royal Academy and the British Institute. In 1817, bearing a letter of warm introduction from Benjamin West, Shaw emigrated to America where he would play a seminal role in the development of the Hudson River School of landscape painting. Once settled, Shaw began to explore the rural areas of the northeast whose raw, powerful beauty of the untamed countryside thrilled his senses and imagination. He was baffled by the fact that few artists on either side of the Atlantic regarded American scenery as a subject of painterly merit. Shaw set about the task of converting the indifferent public perception of the picturesque by traveling "through the different states for the purpose of taking on the spot, the best and most popular views " He envisioned publishing his sketches as a series of some 36 scenic prints and occasional vignettes to be issued in six numbers by subscription. The Philadelphia publisher Thomas Moses first undertook the ambitious project in 1819 but relinquished control to Mathew Carey the following year. For lack of subscribers, the publication foundered after only 20 prints had been produced. Yet, his contemplative and atmospheric style was enthusiastically embraced by the Hudson River School, whose landscapes would be in strong demand from the mid-1820s well into the 1880s. Popular interest revived as well in Shaw's portfolio which Ash reprinted in 1835, according to the bibliographical consensus. In addition to the original vignette of the Monument near West Point, this set contains ten of the plates reissued with Ash's imprint: the pictorial title-page; Washington's Sepulchre Mount Vernon; Falls of St. Anthony on the Mississippi; Burning of Savannah; Norfolk from Gosport, Virginia; Passaic Falls, New Jersey; View of the North River; Hell Gate, Near New York; Oyster Cove; and Passaic River, Below the Falls. The Ash reissue is equally as rare as the Carey edition: it is not recorded in NUC or Worldcat. Deák does however mention a complete, uncolored set of the unbound portfolio at the New York Public Library. REFERENCES: cf. Deák 315; Stauffer 1343; Stokes III. Pl. 87a; not in Sabin or Bennett. PROVENANCE: Skinner Auctions, 8-16 May 2019, lot 256.
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Stirpes novae, aut minus cognitae, quas descriptionibus eticonibus illustravit.

L'HERITIER DE BRUTELLE, Charles Louis (1745-1800) and Pierre-Joseph REDOUTÉ (1759-1840) Six parts in one volume, folio (20 1/4 x 13 1/4 in.; 51.3 x 33.7 cm). Letterpress title and 6 section titles, 91 engraved plates (2 folding) by Juillet, Milsan, Hubert, Maleuvre and others after Pierre-Joseph Redouté (54) and others, plates numbered 1 to 84 with 7 bis plates. CONDITION/BINDING: Mostly marginal dampstaining to top of plates, a few leaves with light spotting. Nineteenth-century half brown morocco; rebacked to style. (65V2A) FIRST EDITION OF L'HERITIER'S FIRST BOTANICAL PUBLICATION WITH ENGRAVINGS: "ONE OF THE MORE DELIGHTFUL FLOWER BOOKS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. This book is splendid in its spacious descriptions, its charming exotic plates, its implications for taxonomic history; and fascinating as an imposing piece of eighteenth-century bookmaking" (Hunt). The six fascicles were issued with pagination but leaves unsigned. Of the 91 plates, showing such extraordinary fidelity to detail, 54 were contributed by Redouté, 25 by Fréret, 4 by Fossier, while the remainder are after Prévost, Jossignoy, Aubriet, Bruguihre, and Sowerby. Although he never completed the work for which at least 120 plates were projected, L'Héritier's main purpose was "to describe, in most cases portray, and classify according to the Linnean system plants that were either new or had gone largely unnoticed." A jurist and amateur botanist, he allowed Redouté access to his magnificent library, and it is from L'Héritier, as Johnston says, that Redouté "learned the finer points of scientific botanic plate illustration." This copy collates as the Hunt copy with the following exceptions: plate 20 is captioned "Urtica arborea" rather than "Parietaria arborea," plate 45 is after Redouté rather than Fréret, and plates 63, 73, and 74 have slight variations in spelling (63: "arborea rather than "arboretum," and 73-74: "Stuartia" rather than "Stewartia." PROVENANCE: O Mundo do Libro (bookseller's ticket on upper pastedown); Christie's New York, 4 December 2018, lot 29. REFERENCES: Brunet III:1043; G. Bucheim, "A Bibliographical Account of L'Héritier's 'Stirpes novae' " in Huntia, vol. 2 (15 October 1965) 29-58; Cleveland Collections 555; Dunthorne 246; Great Flower Books, p.64; Hunt 673; Nissen BBI 1190; Pritzel 5268; Redouté 1; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 4484.
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The Great, or American, Voyages in Latin. Parts I-IX (of 13).

DE BRY, Theodor (1528-1598); DE BRY, Johann Theodor (1560-1623); and DE BRY, Johann Israel (1565-1609) 9 parts in 2 volumes, folio (13 3/4 x 9 1/2 in.; 34.9 x 24.1 cm). Nineteenth-century polished calf, spine in 7 compartments with raised bands; joints rubbed and starting, repairs to spine ends of vol. 2, a few old scrapes on lower boards of both volumes. PROVENANCE: De Bry family of Frankfurt, publishers and engravers of the series of Great Voyages, by descent (engraved bookplate on front pastedowns; Stanley Paul Sax, his sale of Highly Important Americana, Sotheby's New York, 16-17 January 1998, lot 173. PART I. FIRST EDITION, MOSTLY FIRST ISSUE: ADMIRANDA NARRATIO FIDA TAMEN, DE COMMODIS ET INCOLARUM RITIBUS VIRGINIAE. [Hariot's A Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia]. Frankfurt: Johannes Wechel for Theodor de Bry, 1590. Engraved title-page, engraved vignette of arms on dedication leaf (a2), first state of headpiece on a4 with cherub at center and the page number "7" on the outside corner, engraved plate of Adam & Eve, double-page engraved map of Virginia, 23 fine engraved plates (some double or folding) mostly after John White, all plates except 3-4 and 7-8 in the first state, 5 engraved plates of the Picts, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces. All plates, except Adam and Eve, bear the initials "T.B." except plates 5, 6, 11 and 15 which are engraved "G. VEEN." Plates II-XVI and XIX-XXIII and I-V of the Picts are numbered with arabic numerals on the plate. (Church 140 and 141). PART II. SECOND EDITION. BREVIS NARRATIO EORUM QUAE IN FLORIDA AMERICAE PROVI[N]CIA GALLIS ACCIDERUNT [Le Moyne's Florida]. Frankfurt: Johannes Wechel, 1591 [1609]. Engraved title-page, engraved vignette of arms, engraved plate of Noah and his Ark on the notice to the reader, engraved folding map of Florida and Cuba, 42 engraved plates, woodcut initials head- and tailpieces. (Church 146). PART III. SECOND EDITION, SECOND ISSUE. AMERICAE TERTIA PARS MEMORABILEM PROVINCIAE BRASILAE HISTORIAM CONTINENS, GERMANICO PRIMUM SERMONE SCRIPTAM A IOANNE STADIO. [Stadius's Brazil]. Frankfurt: Matthias Becker, 1605 [section title and colophon]. Engraved arms on dedication leaf a2r (leaf a2r is wrongly marked a1r), engraved plate of armorial shields and virtues (a3r), engraved folding map of Mexico, Central and South America, engraved plate of Adam and Eve on p. 144, 45 engraved plates (of which 13 are repeats), woodcut printed music, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces. (Church 151). PART IV. FIRST EDITION, SECOND ISSUE. AMERICAE PARS QUARTA, SIVE, INSIGNIS & ADMIRANDA HISTORIA DE REPERTA PRIMUM OCCIDENTALI INDIA À CHRISTOPHORO COLUMBO ANNO M.CCCCXCII SCRIPTA AB HIERONYMO BEZONO MEDIOLANENSE [Benzoni's History of the New World]. Frankfurt: Johann Feyrabend, 1594. Two engraved title-pages (one is a repeat), second issue, with "Ad |Invistis. Rudolphus II. Rom. Imperator. | Cum privilegio [not prevelegio] S.C."; full-page engraving of armorial shields and virtues, double-page folding engraved map of the Caribbean and adjacent areas, engraved text illustration of Columbus led by marine deities, engraved allegorical text illustration "Americae retectio," 24 engraved plates , second issue, with roman numerals in the letterpress titling and ar abic numerals on the plates. The numbers 2, 6, and 6 in 16 were engraved in reverse. Has blank leaves R6 and 2F6. O3 correctly signed, contrary to Church. (Church 154). PART V. FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE. AMERICAE PARS QUINTA SECUNDAE SECTIONIS HIA [HISTORIAE] HISPANORUM [Benzoni's History, continued]. Frankfurt: Theodor de Bry, 1595. Engraved title-page (with one repeat), double-page engraved map of Mexico, engraved portrait of Columbus on a2r of preface, 20 (of 22) numbered engraved plates, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces, with blank leaves l3-4 and F4. With points: c2 is signed C2; d1 is signed D, e2 is signed E2; l2 is incorrectly signed l3, k2 is incorrectly signed k3. Page 6 is unnumbered, p. 26 misnumbered 29; p. 74 misnumbered 24, and pp. 79-82 numbered 82-92. (Church 156). PART VI. FIRST EDITION. AMERICAE PARS SEXTA, SIVE HISTORIAE AB HIERONYMO BENZONO MEDIOLANENSE SCRIPTAE, SECTIO TERTIA [Benzoni's History, concluded]. Frankfurt: Theodor de Bry, 1596. Engraved title-page (with one repeat), double-page engraved map of the Western Hemisphere with portraits of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, and Pizarro in each corner, double-page engraved view of Cuzco, 27 (of 28) engraved numbered plates, with final blank G6. (Church 158). PART VII. FIRST EDITION. VERISSIMA ET IUCUNDISSIMA DESCRIPTION PRAECIPUARUM QUARUNDAM INDIAE REGIONUM & INSULARUM. [Schmidel's Brazil & Paraguay]. Frankfurt: Theodor de Bry, 1599. Engraved title-page, one engraved plate, with final blank H4. (Church 161). PART VIII. FIRST EDITION, SECOND ISSUE. AMERICAE PARS VIII CONTINENS PRIMO, DESCRIPTIONEM TRIUM ITINERUM NOBILISSIMI ET FORTISSIMO EQUITIES FRANCISCI DRAKEN, QUI PERAGRATO PRIMUM UNIVERSE TERRARIUM ORBE [Voyages of Drake, Hawkins, Cavendish, and Raleigh]. Frankfurt: [Letterpress section title-page: Matthias Becker and] Theodor de Bry 1599. Letterpress title-page with engraved vignette of double hemisphere world map after Jodocus Hondius (Shirley 219), letterpress section title, engraved folding map of Guiana, second issue with small oval world map on KK4v (Shirley 220) and engraved map of the North Atlantic on Aa2r, 17 (of 18) engraved numbered plates, with final blank e4. (Church 164). PART IX. FIRST EDITION. AMERICAE NONA & POSTREMA PARS. QUA DE RATIONE ELEMENTORUM: DE NOVI ORBIS NATURA [Acosta's History of the New World and De Weert's and Van Noort's Voyages]. Frankfurt: Matthias Becker, 1602. Engraved title-page, engraved vignette of coat of arms, four section titles (two letterpress and two with engraved vignettes),the engraved vignette on the "Additamentum" title-page being a portrait of Van Noort incorporating a world map (Shirley 229), engraved map of the Straits of Magellan on ff7, two series of engraved plates numbered I-XXV and I-XIV, with final blanks ff8, Yy6 and ddd4.
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The Naval Achievements of Great Britain from the Year 1793-1817.

JENKINS, James [publisher] 4to (14 1/4 x 11 3/4 in.; 36.2 x 29.9 cm). Handcolored engraved vignette on title-page, 55 fine handcolored aquatint plates chiefly by T. Sutherland after T. Whitcombe (11 plates watermarked 1833), one uncolored engraved plate depicting the ships of the line at the Bombardment of Algiers and the Battle of Trafalgar. BINDING/CONDITION: Light offsetting of plates to text, slightly more pronounced with use of dark pigments, 3-inch marginal tear to text leaf E1, leaf K2 ("Casualties at Camperdown") spotted, marginal spotting to plate "Capture of the Neride" and adjacent text, bottom of platemark of "The Capture of the Dorothea" partially split, "Capture of the L'Immortalité" loose, minor marginal dust-soiling in preliminaries. Contemporary half red morocco over marbled boards, blue holland endpapers, publisher's ticket on front pastedown; worn, upper board scraped, joints rubbed, foot of spine gone, endpapers creased, text block starting at "the Battle of Camperdown." (64V20E) FIRST EDITION, later issue with eleven plates watermarked 1833. First issued in 1817 and subsequently to order. The plates illustrate the naval engagements between Great Britain and France, Spain, Denmark, and the United States. Included are two plates of the Battle of the Nile, three of Trafalgar, and one of the Capture of the USS Chesapeake by the Shannon. "As a record of naval events spanning a period of over twenty years Jenkins' 'Naval Achievements' has no precedent. At no time prior to 1817 had a publisher attempted such a complete volume of documentary naval prints. It is the quality of the accuracy which makes Jenkins so valuable above all, and it is the pictures rather than the text to which the value can be attributed" (Roger Quarm of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England). PROVENANCE: W.S. Brinkley, 11th Hussars (ownership inscription and stamp on title-page). REFERENCES: Abbey, Life 337; Tooley 282.
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Histoire de la navigation de Jean Hugues de Linschot hollandois: aux Indes Orientales – Le Grand Routier de mer de Jean Hugues de Linschot hollandois. Contentant une instruction des routes & cours qui’il convient tenir en la Navigation des Indes Orientale

LINSCHOTEN, Jan Huygen van (1563-1611) Histoire de la navigation de Jean Hugues de Linschot hollandois: aux Indes Orientales - Le Grand Routier de mer de Jean Hugues de Linschot hollandois. Contentant une instruction des routes & cours qui'il convient tenir en la Navigation des Indes Orientales.- Description de l'Amérique & des parties d'icelle, comme de la Nouvelle France, Floride, des Antilles, Iucaya, Cuba, Jamaica, &c. 3 parts in one volume, folio (12 1/4 x 8 in.; 31.1 x 20. 3 cm). Titles of Parts I-II within elaborate engraved border, engraved vignette on title of Part III, engraved portrait of Linschoten, 6 engraved folding maps, including the twin hemispherical world map by J.B. Vrient after Petrus Plancius (Shirley 192), 32 (of 36) engraved double or folding plates, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces, separate pagination for each part but with continuous registration. CONDITION/BINDING: Lacking Church's plates 7, 34-36 (cf. Church 252), Part I title-page tipped in, leaf A2 guarded, plates toned, world map slightly trimmed along bottom, long marginal tears to maps of the Coasts of Abyssinia, Arabia, and Hindostan and of South America and the Antilles, occasional light toning in Part II, strong dampstaining and browning in Part III (quires Pp-Rr), lacking terminal blank. Eighteenth-century half speckled calf; rebacked with chips to spine and joint cracking near foot of spine, endpapers renewed. (64V1A) The third edition with additional commentary on the historical and scientific aspects of the accounts by the physician and natural history collector Bernardus Paludanus, whose annotations are printed in italics. The present edition is virtually a line-for-line reprint of the first French edition of 1619 but is illustrated with the original plates from the first edition of 1595-96-95 published in Dutch (Church 252) rather than with the reduced engravings used in the 1619 edition. During his five years in Goa in the service of the Portuguese, Linschoten recorded the caste system and social customs of India as well as its flora and fauna. Divided into three parts, the first deals with the East Indies and Africa, including regions as far east as China and Japan. The second book delineates navigation of the coasts of West Africa around the Cape of Good Hope to Arabia. The third section is devoted to North America, including Florida, the Caribbean, and Brazil. REFERENCES: Alden/Landis 638/67; JCB III, P. 271; Palau 138584; Sabin 41373.