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Oratio Dominica in CLV linguas versa et exoticis characteribus plerumque expressa

Oratio Dominica in CLV linguas versa et exoticis characteribus plerumque expressa

BODONI] Folio (454 x 281 mm.), [3] leaves, XIX pages, [5] pages, XIX, [5] pages, 20, [2] pages, CCXLVIII, [2] pages; all pages framed within five black filets. A very fine copy, untrimmed, bound in contemporary half red morocco, spine richly gilt. ?The Oratio Dominica is another masterly showing of what Bodoni could do in foreign and ancient alphabets. This polyglot Oratio Dominica was printed at the suggestions of Pope Pius VII who, in May 1805, had passed through Parma on his way from the coronation of Napoleon I. (Updike) The Pope ?made a point of meeting Bodoni. He had a scheme in mind. He described to Bodoni his meeting with Jean-Joseph Marcel, the young director of the Imperial Press in Paris, who had presented him with his Oratio Dominica, a volume containing the Lord's Prayer printed in 150 languages. The Pope then challenged Bodoni to surpass the Frenchman in clarity and quantity. It was the perfect opportunity for Bodoni to show off his skills. It would also be extremely useful to him; he could tie in this effort with his Manuale Tipografico by using type he had already in hand, as well as creating new type for the new book, which he could in turn use in the Manuale .[?] By 1806, Bodoni had fulfilled the pope's challenge and published his own Oratio Dominica, with a dedication to Viceroy Eugène de Beauharnais and his wife, Amalia of Bavaria. It contained the Lord's Prayer in 155 languages. He had bested Marcel. He had created 97 different exotic alphabets, 13 of which did not appear in the Frenchman's book. The remaining pages were printed in Roman type of differing sizes, and 23 were italics. One of the most interesting pages is that containing the Lord's Prayer in Chinese. For this, Bodoni reverted to his earliest form of printing. He engraved the characters (based on Didot's) in wood. They are exceptionally clean and square, and clear. Not only was the Oratio Dominica a book of extraordinary beauty, it was in essence yet another specimen book, with every page containing the Lord's Prayer in a different language, each entry held within a simple rectangular frame. The viceroy was so pleased with it that he wrote to Napoleon on 12 July 1806: "Bodoni is in Milan right now; he came here to present me with the polyglot Oratio Dominica. This is a superb edition, and I must tell Your Majesty that it is much superior to the polyglot edition of the same work put out by Signor Marcel in Paris". (V. Lester, Giambattista Bodoni, his life and his world. Boston, 2015). Brooks 1003.
De maximis et minimus geometrica divinatio in quintum cononicorum Apollonii pergaei

De maximis et minimus geometrica divinatio in quintum cononicorum Apollonii pergaei

VIVIANI, Vincenzo Folio (333 x 230 mm.), [16], 154; [4], 154, [2, errata] pp. Half-title, titles in red and black with woodcut arms of Grand Duke Ferdinand II. Correction slips pasted down to line 18, p 32 and line 8 p 118. With 4 full page engraved plates (2 on one folding sheet), and numerous woodcut text diagrams. Light scattered foxing, overall a a very good copy in contemporary green vellum with double gilt fillet border, spine gilt in compartments from the library of Marchesi Corsi, Villa Corsi-Salviati, Sesto Fiorentino (engraved bookplate by Zocchi). First edition of the first published work by Viviani, ?the most able restitution of the lost Fifth Book of the Conic Sections of Apollonius Pergaeus, made previously to the discovery of Borelli of its existence in an Arabic Version'. (Libri Cat., Auction 1861, nr.3138) Vincenzo Viviani (Florence 1622 ? 1702) was a disciple of Galileo and lived with him in Arcetri for three years. ?Throughout his life, one of Viviani's main interests was in ancient Greek mathematics. As early as 1646, while collaborating with Torricelli, he was also working on a project to restore the work of Aristaeus the Elder. Pappus gave Aristaeus great credit for a work entitled Five Books concerning Solid Loci which had been lost. (Solid Loci is the Greek term for conic sections.) Pappus, however, indicated propositions from the work and Viviani reconstructed the original from these references by Pappus. It was a project that Viviani worked on for most of his life. In 1673 he published a first edition of his restoration but he continued to work on it and his final effort De locis solidis secunda divinatio geometrica in quinque libros iniuria temporum amissos tristaei senioris geometrae was published in 1701 only, two years before his death. Another restoration of a Greek text by Viviani is interesting for a number of reasons. This was his restoration of the fifth book of Apollonius's Conics. At the time he began the restoration only the first four books of this eightbook work had been found and Viviani set about reconstructing the fifth. By 1656 Viviani's work was quite close to completion when Giovanni Alfonso Borelli (a fellow Tuscan Court mathematician) discovered an Arabic version of the first seven books of Apollonius's Conics in the Laurentian Library in Florence. Borelli took the manuscript to Rome where it was translated into Latin by Abrahamus Ecchellensis. In 1659 both the translation from the Arabic and Viviani's restoration were published. Viviani's work was entitled De maximis et minimis geometrica Divinatio and was certainly written by him without any knowledge of the translation of Apollonius's work. It is interesting, of course, to see how faithfully Viviani was able to reconstruct Apollonius's book since now both the reconstruction and the original had become available. Viviani had done an excellent job, his biggest ?error' being that he had been able to penetrate deeper than Apollonius himself. The realisation that Viviani was, in some sense, a better geometer than the revered Apollonius, gave him instant fame throughout the centres of learning in Europe. His reputation as a mathematician was high throughout Europe. Louis XIV of France offered him a position at the Académie Royale in 1666, and John II Casimir of Poland offered Viviani a post as his astronomer, also in 1666. The Grand Duke, not wishing to lose Viviani, appointed him as his mathematician. Viviani accepted this post and turned down the offers from Louis XIV and John II Casimir'. (www-history. mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Biographies/Viviani.html) Carli and Favaro 400; Cinti 135; Honeyman VII 3061; Riccardi II 625.
Fregi e Majuscole incise e fuse da Giambattista Bodoni direttore della Stamperia Reale

Fregi e Majuscole incise e fuse da Giambattista Bodoni direttore della Stamperia Reale

BODONI] Octavo (197 x 120 mm.), [2] leaves, XII pages, 48 pages, [1] leaf, pages 49-56. On title-page a contemporary manuscript note: St. Pauli, ex dono clarissimi auctoris. A very fine copy bound in modern Burgundy morocco. The first type specimen printed by Giambattista Bodoni, rare. ?In Fregi e Majuscole we are able to see what types and ornaments Bodoni used in the earlier part of his career. They are (as he says in his very "worth-while" preface) a derivation from Fournier, but lack that precision which Bodoni embodied so characteristically in his 19th century types. They exhibit, however, his admiration for Fournier, whom he copied in a flattering but barefaced manner. Granted that the most agreeable features of the book are copied, this "specimen" of 1771 is one of the most tasteful and charming volumes of its kind in existence. Each page is surrounded with borders, of which scarcely one is bad, and scarcely two alike. The types are old style, but their delicacy shows current tendencies; and this is specially true of the italic. The Greek character is condensed and very ugly, and but one font is shown as against the twenty-eight varieties exhibited in Bodoni's Greek specimen of 1788. Bodoni's ornamented letters are modelled on those of Fournier. The 377 vignettes or ornaments (exactly the number shown in the Manuel) are mostly recut after Fournier's designs, but Bodoni's versions have less color and warmth and a certain Italian twist to them -of those shown, all but two (305 and 325) are copies or adaptations. Their arrangements as borders for initials and as head-pieces, etc, is ingenious. Bodoni's title-page, halftitle to the specimen of types, and some minor decorations -for instance, the type "bees" surrounding type 2 flowers", to which he has added the familiar motto from Virgil - are neatly "lifted" from Fournier's Manuel. All the same, the book is enormously instructive to compare with Bodoni's great, chilly masterpieces, the Oratio Dominica and the Manuale Tipografico of 1818. (Updike). Brooks 16.
Album collection Chèques pub titre assurances exchange bank USA CUBA Chromo 1850

Album collection Chèques pub titre assurances exchange bank USA CUBA Chromo 1850

Album Composite de 78 pages format H 30.5 X L 23.5 cm environ de feuillets avec collés la plupart du temps par les 4 coins de plus de 340 documents des chèques vierges, lettres de changes Bons aux porteurs et certificats de paiements ou de détenteurs d’Actions la plupart de Banques ou compagnies Américaines, essentiellement de la ville de New-York ou de succursales autour de 1850 et plus. Quelques-unes de L’ile de Cuba et ville de la Havane. Quelques-unes détachées et libres. Des cartes de visites cartes porcelaines pour compagnies d’assurances dont beaucoup contre les incendies toujours la plupart de compagnies Américaines et beaucoup de publicités ou cartes de visites de lithographes et graveurs. Des publicités et étiquettes pour parfumeurs, et marchands d’alcool vins fins liqueurs et vins de Bordeaux. Beaucoup représentés aux USA Quelques images pieuses et lithographies parsemées parfois dans l’Album, Album probablement composé par un représentant ou commercial pour un imprimeur. Ci-dessous la liste détaillée non exhaustive de la collection incroyable contenue de cet album unique en son genre . Chèques vierges ou lettres de changes autour de 1850 parfois en doubles ou triples State bank of Ohio ( Crawford brice Co ) New-York Nassau Bank ( Dix Edward & Co) Mauch Chunk the Mehigh Boat and Navigation Compagnie ( Mauch Chunk Office ) New-York continental Bank ( R Caldwell Co ) New-York The Park Bank ( Emigrant Industrial Saving Bank ) New-York Continental Bank ( J F Orwitt ) Farrington and BlizardBankers ( lettre de change ) Bank of Montreal ( John Arnour Montreal ) New-York Metropolitan Bank ( Thompson Livingstone é Cie ) New-York Merchants Bank (M Morgan & Son ) New-York Ocean Bank ( Nathan lane & Co ) Office of Woodward & Saltonstall Chicago ( N°17 Clark Street ) ( lettre de change to Mess Lockwood & Co New-York ) New-York Messrs Duncan Sherman & Compy Bankers ( Bliss Douglas Wheelock & Cie) New-York Bank of New-York ( Corbett & Grant ) New-York Union Bank ( Edmund Miller ) New-York Importers & Traders Bank ( Waldron Ilsley & Co ) n Monticello Bank Charlottesville va New-york Market Bank ( JC Hull & Sons ) St Louis Mo M G Moies & Co New-york Importers & Traders Bank ( North, Sherman & co ) New-york Established 1752 ( Saltus & Co ) lettre de change at the Merchant Bank New-York Leather Manufactures Bank ( John C Beale ) Passaic County Bank New-York Phenix Bank ( Samuel C Reed & Co ) Bank of Commerce in New-York ( F Vocel & Co ) Auditor office Frankfort Bank of Kentucky Frankfort Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur grise illisible Montreal Bank of British North America Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur grise marron New-York American exchange Bank ( North Sherman & Co ) New-York Nassau Bank ( Dix Edward & Co) bis Toronto Bank of Upper Canada ( Godderham Worts & Wilmot ) St louis Mo A ordre de MG MOIES & Co To the Mechanics Bank New-York Continental Bank ( Harris & Co ) New-York Island City Bank ( G F A Hinrichs) Farrington and BlizardBankers ( lettre de change ) bis State of New-York the Waverly Bank ( avant 1850) Lettre de Change Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur de Philadelphie New-York Marine Bank New-York Importers & traders Bank ( Dix & Edwards) New-york City bank ( Popham & Haxtun ) New Britain CT Mercantile Bank of Hartford ( New Britain Savings Bank & Building Association ) New -York Bank of Republic ( Trenholm, Bro & Co) Mauch Chunk The mehigh Boat & Navigation Company Philadelphia bis New-York Brooklyn Bank Brooklyn ( John Mendell) New-York Continental Bank Philadelphia Bank of North America ( Price, Ferris & Co ) New York Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur ( R O Skinner New-York Leather Manufactures Bank ( John C Beale ) bis New-York Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur Clarke & White and Congress Spring Saratoga Springs New-York Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur William HLee & Co Philadelpha Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur New-York Mechanics Bank ( Woodward & Cromwell) Lettre de Change ou bon au porteur New-York
Le plus beau cadeau (Poésies d’enfants non-voyants)

Le plus beau cadeau (Poésies d’enfants non-voyants)

Préface de Jean-Clarence Lambert Le plus beau cadeau (Poésies d’enfants non-voyants) Préface de Jean-Clarence Lambert In-plano, sous emboîtage de toile beige d’éditeur. Complet de son texte (en français et en braille), justification de tirage, ainsi que de ses 7 gravures originales par ALECHINSKY, Eduardo CHILLIDA, MIOTTE, C-H. PEDERSEN, SUGAÏ, Joan MIRO et TAPIES. Toutes les gravures sont numérotées 1/80 et signées au crayon gris par l’artiste. Composition en braille réalisée par l’Imprimerie de l’association Valentin Haüy. Imprimé au centre d’art graphique de la Métairie Bruyère à Parly ; le 8 mars 1995. Edité par l’Association artistique et caritative de Parly dans l’Yonne (ACPY). Tirage à 103 exemplaires sur vélin d’Arches. Exemplaire numéroté 1/80 (Un des 10 exemplaires marqué ACPY réservé à l’Association). Dimensions : H63xL45,5 cm (pour les planches et le texte) Dimensions : H70,5xL54 (pour la boîte). Etat de conservation : Légères traces de manipulation pour l’emboîtage, l’intérieur (planches et texte) en parfait état de conservation. L’idée de ce livre remonte à 1968, lorsque Robert et Lydie Dutrou décidèrent de réunir leurs amis artistes autour d’un même livre. Robert Dutrou: «Le premier à s’être impliqué dans ce projet fut Miró. Un jour, alors qu’il travaillait dans notre atelier, notre nièce non-voyante entra dans la pièce et voulut voir la gravure qu’il préparait. Grâce au relief laissé par la plaque de cuivre sur le papier, elle a pu reconnaître un oiseau (Le grand duc) que Miró venait de créer. Il fut à la fois très touché et ému que son travail de graveur puisse être vu par quelqu’un qui n’avait plus l’usage de ses yeux. « C’est à ce moment qu’il a décidé de participer à notre projet.