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Morning Glory: A Biography of Mary Lou Williams

Morning Glory: A Biography of Mary Lou Williams

Dahl, Linda New York: Pantheon Books, 2000. First Edition. Hard Cover. Near Fine/Near Fine. First edition. 2000 Hard Cover. viii, 463 pp. "Mary Lou Williams -- pianist, arranger, composer, and probably the most influential woman in the history of jazz -- receives the attention she has long deserved in the definitive biography by a leading scholar of women in jazz. The illegitimate child of an impoverished and indifferent mother, Williams began performing publicly at the age of seven when she became known admiringly in her native Pittsburgh as "the little piano girl of East Liberty," playing one day for the Mellons at bridge teas and the next in gambling dens where the hat was passed for change. She grew up with the jazz of the early part of the century, championed by the likes of Earl Hines and Fats Waller, yet unlike so many other musicians of her time, she was open to new forms in jazz -- she was an early champion of bop, and a mentor and colleague to its central figures, such as Thelonius Monk and Bud Powell -- and in broader musical styles as well (after her conversion to Catholicism, she wrote masses and other sacred music). Most of the other famous women in jazz -- Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald -- have been singers. Williams was instead a phenomenal pianist who performed solo, with small groups and big bands, in vaudeville and clubs, and on numerous records. But she is equally well known today as a composer and arranger of remarkable versatility and power, having worked with, among others, Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman. Her compositions have been recorded by artisits as varied as Marian McPartland, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat "King" Cole, Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, and herself -- and, more recently, by cutting-edge players Geri Allen and Dave Douglas. But Williams was more than "just a musician"; her interests were catholic in both senses, and she struggled to combine her love of music with her love of God. She was a tireless humanitarian, and made ongoing attempts to help dozens of down-and-out musicians; in the 1950s, her apartment was, at times, virtually a rehab. Though she was often in emotional despair, she found comfort for her many disappointments and hurts not only in her music but in her spirituality. Linda Dahl, granted unprecedented access to the large Williams archive, has given us the whole of Williams's very full life, from her often harrowing days on the road to her tumultuous marriages and love affairs, from the ups and downs of her unique fifty-year career to the remarkable spirituality that came to inform both her daily life and her music. This is a striking portrait of one of our least understood and most important musicians.
Now's the Time: A Story of Music

Now's the Time: A Story of Music, Education, and Advocacy

Corman, Ned; Enslin, Rob; Mangione, Chuck; Carter, Ron; Wesley, Fred; Hasty, D. Stanley Rhinebeck: Epigraph Books, 2012. Trade Paperback. Near Fine. Minimal wear to corners. 2012 Trade Paperback. 281 pp. "Almost everyone has a favorite teacher. For thousands of New Yorkers during the second half of the twentieth century, it was Ned Corman. With his trademark long hair and hip elocution, Ned wasn't your usual high school band director. Nor was he a card-carrying hippie. Students gravitated to him, and he dug them right back. Along the way, some great music was made. Ned has always lived in parallel universes. After graduating from the world-famous Eastman School of Music and later Penn State, he went on the road with Chuck Mangione, Fred Waring, and a touring production of Half of Sixpence, as well as co-led a rock-and-roll 'horn band.' Ned also worked the classical side of the tracks, spending forty years with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra as an 'extra' and a sometime soloist, doing pit work, and teaching privately. More often than not, he was as good as his last job. While teaching music in the Rochester suburb of Penfield, Ned saw the creative possibilities of getting students together with professional musicians. He launched the Penfield Music Commission Project, followed by The Commission Project. The impact of these projects led to his involvement with Swing 'n Jazz, the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, Rochester Independent Music Festival, and Greentopia. Both an autobiography and part 'how-to' manual for aspiring arts leaders, Now
Esquire's World of Jazz

Esquire's World of Jazz

Editors of Esquire; Poling, James; Gillenson, Lewis W.; Doyle, Philip; Wood, Brendan; Lissner, John; Weinstock, Sally; Teichberg, Ira New York: Esquire, Inc. / Grosset & Dunlap, 1962. First Edition. Large Hardcover. Good/Good. Shahn, Ben; Ungerer, Tomi; et al. First edition. Edges lightly foxed, jacket edges rubbed with minor loss from corners, jacket spine faded, jacket price clipped, ink gift note on front endpaper. 1962 Large Hardcover. 224 pp. Color photographs and illustrations tipped in, black-and-white images in text. "From the outset of its publishing history, Esquire Magazine involved itself with jazz. In its pages, such gifted writers as E. Simms Campbell, Nat Hentoff, Leonard Feather, Budd Schulberg, Paul E. Miller, John Clellon Holmes, Chas. E. Smith, George Frazier and Ralph Ellison frequently brought the vibrant story of jazz to the magazine's readers. Jazz stars such as Louis Armstrong, George Wettling, and Dizzy Gillespie wrote personal accounts of their colorful experiences from Storyville to Minton's. And even Leonard Bernstein borrowed its pages to engage in controversy with Gene Krupa, the former insisting that jazz influenced the symphony while the peripatetic drummer rejected the idea outright. All of this and much, much more is contained within the pages of Esquire's World of Jazz together with perhaps the most stunning collection of jazz photographs, paintings and sculptures ever included in one volume. Such talented artists as Larry Rivers, Bruce Mitchell, Ben Shahn, Burt Goldblatt, Philip Evergood, William King, Henry Markowitz, Jay Maisel, Art Kane, Lou Lomonaco, Tomi Ungerer, Charles Stewart, Charles Peterson, Stephen Colhoun and Robert Andrew Parker are represented in magnificent reproductions.
Chasin' the Trane: The Music and Mystique of John Coltrane

Chasin' the Trane: The Music and Mystique of John Coltrane

Thomas, J.C Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc, 1975. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/Very Good. First edition. Clipped newspaper review mounted on rear endpaper. 1975 Hard Cover. 252 pp. 8vo. "Always elusive, constantly moving, incessantly changing, John Coltrane stood astride the jazz world of the late 50s and 60s. He was a giant of the saxophone and a major composer. His music influenced both rock stars and classical musicians. There was a mystical quality, a profound melancholy emanating from this quiet, self-contained man that moved listeners - some of whom knew little about music but heard something beyond music's boundaries in the sounds his saxophone created. J.C. Thomas traces John Coltrane's life and career from his North Carolina childhood through his apprenticeship with Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Miles Davis, to its culmination in the saxophonist's classic quartet that played to steadily increasing audiences throughout America, Europe, and Japan.The author has drawn on the recollections of the people who knew Coltrane best boyhood friends, band members like Elvin Jones, spiritual mentors like Ravi Shankar, and the women who loved him. Chasin' the Trane is the story of a man who struggled against drug addiction, studied African and Eastern music and philosophy, admired both Einstein's expanding universe and the shimmering sounds a harp makes, and left behind the enduring legacy of a master musician who was also a beautiful man.
Bernardo de Galvez: Hero of the American Revolution

Bernardo de Galvez: Hero of the American Revolution

LaFarelle, Lorenzo G Austin: Eakin Press, 1992. First Edition. Hard Cover. Near Fine/Near Fine. First edition. Top edge faintly foxed, otherwise an excellent copy. 1992 Hard Cover. xiv, 76 pp. "The life and times of Bernardo de Galvez are beginning to find a rightful place in American history. General de Galvez was commander of Spanish forces whose support for the American Revolution went well beyond statesmanship and moral encouragement. His direction of the Spanish military offensive against the British in Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida helped the colonists make the Declaration of Independence a reality. Dr. LaFarelle follows the life of the General from its beginnings in Andalusia on the south central coast of Spain near the Mediterranean. Born into a family long in the royal service of Spain, he was baptized and named Bernardo Vicente Polimar de Galvez y Gallardo. Eventually, he was to be known simply as Bernardo de Galvez. The author traces the General's life through his service in northern Mexico, and the Spanish territory that would become the American states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. He follows with his service as Viceroy of New Spain and his death in Mexico City. The author brings General de Galvez out of relative obscurity and presents him as one of the salient figures in both American and Spanish colonial history. He helps Texans to understand why one of the state's early gulf coast cities, Galveston, honors the General with its name.
Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)

Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History (The Civilization of the American Indian Series)

Tanner, Helen Hornbeck; Hast, Adele; Peterson, Jacqueline; Surtees, Robert J Norman: The University of Oklahoma Press, 1987. 2nd Printing. Large Softcover. Near Fine. Pinther, Miklos. 2nd printing. 1987 Large Softcover. xv, 224 pp. "The Indian history of the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada, and particularly of the Ohio Valley, is so complex that it can be properly clarified only with the visual aid of maps. The Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History, in a sequence of thirty-three newly researched maps printed in as many as five colors, graphically displays the movement of Indian communities from 1640 to about 1871, when treaty making between Indian tribes and the United States government came to an end. History was shaped in this part of North America by intertribal warfare, refugee movements, epidemics of European-introduced diseases, French and English wars and trade rivalry, white population advances, Indian resistance, Indian treaties deeding land to state and national governments, and imperfect arrangements for reservations, removal, and allotment of land. The changing pattern of Indian village locations as a result of all these factors is shown on the maps. Each map is highlighted by accompanying text, written as if the author were pointing out specific places on the map. Eighty-one illustrations convey a realistic impression of the land and its people.
Hard Bop: Jazz & Black Music

Hard Bop: Jazz & Black Music, 1955-1965

Rosenthal, David H New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. 1st Printing. Trade Paperback. Near Fine. First paperback printing. Pages lightly toned. 1992 Trade Paperback. xi, 208 pp. "It's nineteen fifty-something, in a dark, cramped, smoke-filled room. Everyone's wearing black. And on-stage a tenor is blowing his heart out, a searching, jagged saxophone journey played out against a moody, walking bass and the swish of a drummer's brushes. To a great many listeners--from African American aficionados of the period to a whole new group of fans today--this is the very embodiment of jazz. It is also quintessential hard bop. In this, the first thorough study of the subject, jazz expert and enthusiast David H. Rosenthal vividly examines the roots, traditions, explorations and permutations, personalities and recordings of a climactic period in jazz history. Beginning with hard bop's origins as an amalgam of bebop and R&B, Rosenthal narrates the growth of a movement that embraced the heavy beat and bluesy phrasing of such popular artists as Horace Silver and Cannonball Adderley; the stark, astringent, tormented music of saxophonists Jackie McLean and Tina Brooks; the gentler, more lyrical contributions of trumpeter Art Farmer, pianists Hank Jones and Tommy Flanagan, composers Benny Golson and Gigi Gryce; and such consciously experimental and truly one-of-a-kind players and composers as Andrew Hill, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, and Charles Mingus. Hard bop welcomed all influences--whether Gospel, the blues, Latin rhythms, or Debussy and Ravel--into its astonishingly creative, hard-swinging orbit. Although its emphasis on expression and downright "badness" over technical virtuosity was unappreciated by critics, hard bop was the music of black neighborhoods and the last jazz movement to attract the most talented young black musicians. Fortunately, records were there to catch it all. The years between 1955 and 1965 are unrivaled in jazz history for the number of milestones on vinyl. Miles Davis's Kind of Blue, Charles Mingus's Mingus Ah Um, Thelonious Monk's Brilliant Corners, Horace Silver's Further Explorations--Rosenthal gives a perceptive cut-by-cut analysis of these and other jazz masterpieces, supplying an essential discography as well. For knowledgeable jazz-lovers and novices alike, Hard Bop is a lively, multi-dimensional, much-needed examination of the artists, the milieus, and above all the sounds of one of America's great musical epochs.
The Private Afrikakorps Photograph Collection of Rommel's Chief-of-Staff Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein

The Private Afrikakorps Photograph Collection of Rommel's Chief-of-Staff Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein

Spayd, P.A.; Dittmar-Bayerlein, Fritz Atglen: Schiffer Military History, 2004. First Edition. Large Hardcover. Near Fine/Very Good. First edition. 1 inch closed tear on front jacket corner repaired with clear tape on reverse, sticker removal mark on top corner of front endpaper. 2004 Large Hardcover. 174 pp. Oblong. "Now, for the first time, the private Afrikakorps photograph collection of Rommel's second in command, Generalleutnant Fritz Bayerlein, is presented in this landmark publication. Over 200 photographs, showing personalities, battle scenes, behind the front line rest periods, and non-battle scenery such as a tour of ancient ruins with Rommel are featured. Brought to life here are the famous Afrikakorps personalities such as Rommel, Nehring, Cruwell, and von Thoma. The Afrikakorps commanders, their fighting men, the awards for bravery, the graves, and even mundane military life in the heat of the Libyan desert, Bayerlein's array of photographs depict the war in the Western Desert as he saw it. From his arrival in the Western Desert in October 1941, through his final, and bitter departure in May 1943, Bayerlein took hundreds of photographs. This gallery of images unfolds Bayerlein's rise in rank, from an Oberstleutnant under General Cruwell to Generalleutnant under his friend and mentor, Erwin Rommel. Fritz Dittmar-Bayerlein, the General's nephew and co-author, has generously opened his uncle's photograph collection which had been in storage for over thirty years. Retrace Bayerlein's steps and the campaigns across the desert sands - an undiscovered perspective on the legacy of the vaunted Afrikakorps.
A Vermont Cavalryman in War & Love: The Civil War Letters of Brevet Major General William Wells and Anna Richardson

A Vermont Cavalryman in War & Love: The Civil War Letters of Brevet Major General William Wells and Anna Richardson

Wells, William; Richardson, Anna; Hoffman, Elliott W Lynchburg / Saline: Schroeder Publications / McNaughton & Gunn, Inc, 2007. First Edition. Hard Cover. Fine/Fine. First edition. 2007 Hard Cover. xxxii, 544 pp. William Wells has the distinction of being one of the few men to rise from the rank of private to brevet major general. Through Wells letters, the reader will become familiar with the inner workings of one of the most successful cavalry regiments in the Civil War capturing 39 cannon, three flags, and 1,000 prisoners in the course of 73 engagements. This new primary source material is appealing to those with various interests in the Civil War outside Wells and the 1st Vermont Cavalry. Wells was captured by Confederate Colonel John Mosby on March 17, 1863, near Herndon, Virginia. Wells was a prisoner of war for seven weeks, spending most of that time at Libby Prison. At Gettysburg, Wells and General Elon Farnsworth rode side by side into the ill-fated July 3, 1863, dash into the Confederate right flank, for which Wells earned the Medal of Honor in that gallant and futile charge. Wells and the regiment also served valiantly in Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign and at Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah Valley on October, 19, 1864. By the last year of the war he was a brigade commander and Major General George Armstrong Custer's right hand man. This book not only gives new insight to Custer through Wells eyes, but other Civil War figures such as Farnsworth, Wilson, Mosby, and Kilpatrick. At first, the letters are written to Wells parents and friends until mid-1863 when he commenced writing to Friend Anna Richardson. At the time Wells was 25 years old. Anna responded positively. The reader can see the relationship develop to the point of marriage in these letters. In one of Wells first letters, he relates how he was almost captured for a second time, but was able to escape only after the loss of his horse and wallet that contained $125. Anna writes of her memories of the short time they had together. The letters compel the reader to see what is written next in this budding relationship and their longing to be together. On a furlough home in January 1865, Wells and Anna became engaged during a sleigh ride the only time they were together since the commencement of their correspondence. In 1865, Wells commanded a brigade that consisted of the 8th New York, 15th New York, 3rd Indiana, and 1st Vermont. In the engagement at Waynesboro, Virginia, on March 2, the brigade captured 15 battle flags while eliminating Confederate General Jubal Early's command. Two days later Anna received a ring, and on March 8, she scrawled her vows in a letter to Wells. At the Battle of Five Forks, Wells wrote Anna that his clothes had six holes made by bullets and that he was hit by a spent piece of shell. On April 3, Wells brigade routes the Confederate Brigade of General Rufus Barringer at Namozine Church. At Appomattox Station on April 8, Wells men were in the thick of the fight capturing a large number of Confederate soldiers and cannon. Then, at Appomattox Court House on April 9th, his men were engaged in some of the last fighting that fateful day when the truce flags are sent out by Lee s army. Following the Appomattox Campaign, Wells was commissioned a full brigadier general and took command of the division, and he mustered out of service on January 15, 1866, and married Anna three days later. Hoffman leaves Wells letters the way they were originally written. Furthermore, nothing has been omitted from the letters to make them politically correct for today's world. War and romance combine to make an intriguing and unique primary source account.