last 24 hours
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

The Book Collector, Inc.

On the Greek Style: Selected Essays in Poetry and Hellenism

On the Greek Style: Selected Essays in Poetry and Hellenism

George Seferis (1900 1971) x+196 pages. Octavo (8" x 5 1/4") bound in original publisher's yellow cloth with black lettering to spine in original jacket. Translated by Rex Warner and Th D Frangopoulos. Introduction by Rex Warner. From the library of William Burford. First American edition. The cultural ornaments of Greece today: Melina Mercouri and the late Kazantzakis. But to the more cultivated mind, the poet George Seferis is considered a superior example, embodying both the Hellenic spirit and the modern European tenor. Like Perse and Neruda, he has been a diplomat as well as a man of letters, and his essays, presented here for the first time in English, are not airy abstractions wafting wearily out of the classroom. Though they are very much concerned with Greek language and history and the uses of tradition, and often incline to lofty adjectives like ""holy"" and ""fervent,"" the intent is always to keep literature alive, to make palpable the ever changing links between past and present. Art is sanctity and also worldliness, a controlled passion and something demonic; above all, perhaps, it is a distillation of a people and a place which must be constantly renewed. Homer and the other gods hover a good deal over these writings; a cosmopolitan Seferis may be but he is very much more a proud nationalist; one has only to read his stately panegyric to the 19th century patriot Makryannis to observe that. The weightiest piece, comparing Cavafy and Eliot, while hardly telling us anything new about the latter, is certainly the best commentary we've come across concerning the Alexandrian poet, full of acute and vivid remarks which do much to clarify Cavafy's idiosyncratic classicism and twilight irony. All in all, a most persuasive volume. William Burford was an American modernist poet who now is most often described by the Internet as the friend of the more renowned poet James Merrill. The poet appeared in Poetry Magazine several times between 1949 and 1953. Based on the Poetry Foundation s archives, twenty of his poems were published alongside poets who are better remembered today, including William Carlos Williams and E. E. Cummings. According to Poets & Writers, Burford published two books of poetry: A World in 1962 and A Beginning in 1968. Condition" Burford's marginalia, notes and underlining through out and signed by him on the front end paper. Jacket with some closed edge tears, spine ends rubbed else better than very good in like jacket.
Sources of the Mississippi and the Western Louisiana Territory

Sources of the Mississippi and the Western Louisiana Territory

Zubulon Montgomery Pike (1843-1873) [iii]+279+68+52+88 pages with tables, maps (2 folding) and appendices Octavo (8 1/4" x 5 1/2") bound in original publisher's maroon cloth with gilt lettering to spine and cover. Reprint of the 1810 edition. Zebulon Pike, the U.S. Army officer who in 1805 led an exploring party in search of the source of the Mississippi River, sets off with a new expedition to explore the American Southwest. Pike was instructed to seek out headwaters of the Arkansas and Red rivers and to investigate Spanish settlements in New Mexico. Pike and his men left Missouri and traveled through the present-day states of Kansas and Nebraska before reaching Colorado, where he spotted the famous mountain later named in his honor. From there, they traveled down to New Mexico, where they were stopped by Spanish officials and charged with illegal entry into Spanish-held territory. His party was escorted to Santa Fe, then down to Chihuahua, back up through Texas, and finally to the border of the Louisiana Territory, where they were released. Soon after returning to the east, Pike was implicated in a plot with former Vice President Aaron Burr to seize territory in the Southwest for mysterious ends. However, after an investigation, Secretary of State James Madison fully exonerated him. The information he provided about the U.S. territory in Kansas and Colorado was a great impetus for future U.S. settlement, and his reports about the weakness of Spanish authority in the Southwest stirred talk of future U.S. annexation. Condition: Front exterior hinge cracked else good to very good.
Moon of Madness

Moon of Madness

Rohmer, Sax [PSEUD Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward (1883-1959)] viii+233 pages. Small octavo (7 1/2" x 5") bound in original publisher's full orange cloth, front board and spine stamped in red, original pictorial dust jacket. First edition. Major O'Shea has come to Madeira on board a German liner following a certain furthest character, when into his calculations come hurting the unexpected in the form of romance. A willful visit aboard the liner by Nanette, who is visiting Madeira with her parents, brings the pair together. The girl immediately falls in love with the debonair and dashing young man whose mission is such a deep secret. O'Shea, knowing the the desperateness of his situation, repels the sentiment which he himself eels for the girl. Thus it is that they enter the lists against the devilish plots of a gang bent on destroying the Empire and thus it is that the devil-may-care young Irishman comes to have a heartier respect or the abilities of a flapper who at first seems to thing of nothing more serious than to swim out to a liner for a glass of beer. Here is a story packed to the brim with exciting events and exciting, irresistible people. Condition: Cloth spine sunned, corners bumped, light soiling to binding, bookseller's ink-stamp and residue on front end-papers which are toned and foxed. Jacket Tape repairs to jacket verso, spine toned and chipped, jacket panels worn, chipped, soiled, a few tears else very good in about very good jacket.
Zurich International Chess Tournament

Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953

Bronstein, David Ionovich (1924-2006) xviii+349+[11 ad] pages with tables and diagrams. Royal octavo (9 1/4" x 6 1/4") bound in original publisher's pictorial jacket. Translated from the second Russian edition by Jim Marfia. First American edition. This event was played in Neuhausen am Rheinfall and Zürich. These are the games in order according to David Bronstein's excellent book, Zurich International Chess Tournament 1953. He participated in the tournament with the strongest players in the world at that time in a candidates match to determine the next challenger to world champion Mikhail Botvinnik. The Swiss Chess Federation spent 100,000 Swiss francs in order to stage the event, which was one of the reasons they insisted that host countries pay the travel expenses for their respective players. Prize money for first place was 5,000 Swiss francs. Alois Nagler was tournament director. All contestants brought a second except for Bronstein and Reshevsky: Miroljub Trifunovic (Gligoric), Salomon Flohr (Taimanov), Julio Bolbochan (Najdorf), Andre Lilienthal (Petrosian), Mikhail Beilin (Averbakh), Carel Benjamin van den Berg (Euwe), Kristian Skold (Stahlberg), Tibor Florian (Szabó), Alexey Sokolsky (Boleslavsky), Viktor Moiseev (Kotov), Igor Bondarevsky (Geller), Vladimir Simagin (Smyslov), and Alexander Kazimirovich Tolush (Keres). The opening banquet featured speeches by FIDE President Folke Rogard, Mark Taimanov, and Miguel Najdorf. Smyslov sang an aria from Italian opera and Taimanov played piano compositions by Tchaikovsky and Chopin. The players and their seconds stayed at the Bellevue Hotel in the beautiful resort town of Neuhausen am Rheinfall. Play began on Sunday 30 August in the spacious Kirchgemeindehaus (Parish Hall), which would host the first eight rounds. A local factory had pledged a gold watch to whoever led after Round 7, which turned out to be both Smyslov and Reshevsky. Both got a watch. In Round 9 play began in the Kongresshaus (Salon of Music in the House of Parliament) in Zürich, which would host the rest of the tournament. From rounds 9-11 Reshevsky led, only to be overtaken by Smyslov in round 12. At the conclusion of the first half of the tournament, Smyslov was the only undefeated player, leading Reshevsky and Bronstein by a point. The American kept pace with Smyslov, sharing the lead by Round 21. The stage was set for a showdown in Round 25, with Reshevsky just a half point behind Smyslov and facing him in their second meeting of the tournament- Smyslov vs Reshevsky, 1953. Smyslov obtained an advantage out of the opening and began inexorably to restrict black's activity. Smyslov judged that "objectively, this move should be condemned, since it makes it easier for White to attack." 10 Reshevsky resigned after 56 moves, giving Smyslov a 1 1/2 point lead over him with five rounds to go. Smyslov finished with a winning margin of two points, thereby earning the right to play Mikhail Botvinnik in a match for the world championship: Botvinnik - Smyslov World Championship Match (1954). Condition: Light extremity wear, corners gently bumped else very good.
The Dragon Murder Case: A Philo Vance Story

The Dragon Murder Case: A Philo Vance Story

S. S. Van Dine [PSEUD Willard Huntington Wright (1888-1939)] xiv+311+[1 blank]+[6 ad] pages with map to front pastedowns and end papers. Small octavo (7 1/2" x 5 1/4") bound in original publisher's black cloth with red lettering to spine and in red rectangular box to cover in original publisher's pictorial jacket. First edition. The Dragon Murder Case is a novel in a series by S. S. Van Dine about fictional detective Philo Vance. It was also adapted to a film version in 1934, starring Warren William as Vance. A guest at an estate in northern Manhattan (Inwood Hill Park) dives into the swimming pool and disappears. His murder brings up references to a mythological dragon which is said to prey on the imprudent, but Philo Vance uses his knowledge of both dragons and criminals to demonstrate whodunit. The estate in the novel was based on Tryon Hall, built in 1907 by C. K. G. Billings, a retired president of the Chicago Coke and Gas Company. In 1917 he sold the mansion to John D. Rockefeller Jr. The mansion burned down in 1926, and Rockefeller developed the property, and others, into Fort Tryon Park, which he then donated to New York City. The Dragon Murder Case is the seventh novel featuring Van Dine's Philo Vance character. Some critics saw this as marking a significant change in the series, including crime novelist Julian Symons who wrote, "The decline in the last six Vance books is so steep that the critic who called the ninth of them 'one more stitch in his literary shroud' was not overstating the case. Further unfavorable critiques from culture historian Jacques Barzun noted, "The estate and its denizens are meant to be as picturesque as the persons and the plot, but all succeed only in being as egregious and improbable as Philo Vance and his antics." Condition: Cloth spine a bit dull, some mild rubbing, soiling to binding, small bump to lower edge of rear board, a few pages unread and unopened. Jacket with lower edge of rear panel chipped and with a large creased tear, a few small tears and creases, spine ends rubbed else better than very good in a very jacket.
method-draw-image (23)

Burning Daylight

London, Jack (1876-1916) [8]+361+[1]+[12 add]+[3 blank] pages with 8 plates including frontispiece. Small Octavo (7 3/4" x 5 1/2"). MACMILLAN spine imprint and three blank leaves at rear which normally denotes second state; page 336 blank. bound in original publisher's blue cloth with lettering in white on spine and cover with illustrations in cream and blue. [BAL 11918; Marten & Sissons 47p] [APG London 305a] First edition, second state. Burning Daylight is a novel by Jack London, published in 1910, which was one of the best-selling books of that year and it was London's best-selling book in his lifetime. The novel takes place in the Yukon Territory in 1893. The main character, nicknamed "Burning Daylight" was the most successful entrepreneur of the Alaskan Gold Rush. The story of the main character was partially based upon the life of Oakland entrepreneur "Borax" Smith. The novel was adapted for American films in 1914, 1920, 1928, and 2010. The novel was filmed as a First National movie starring Milton Sills with Doris Kenyon. The 2010 film version was produced and directed by Sanzhar Sultanov. This version concentrated on the second half of the book, when the character goes to New York and plays on Wall Street.[3] The title character, Burning Daylight, was played by Robert Knepper. The film held its first public screening on August 9, 2010 in Jack London's hometown of Sonoma, California. Condition: Soiled, corners bumped and rubbed, spine ends rubbed, MacMillan mostly rubbed at spine heal, white lettering to spine in "Burning" rubbed off, former bookplate removed from front paste down and writing to pastedown and front end paper, internal soiling and some pages dogeared else a good copy lacking dust jacket.