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Chess Review Annual: he Picture Chess Magazine, Volume 31

Israel Albert (I A) Horowitz (1907-1973) editor Twelve monthly issues 384 pages with pictures, diagrams and photographs. Quarto (11 1/4" x 8 3/4") Volume 31, bound in original publisher's red cloth with gilt lettering to spine. Volume 31. (Betts: 7-76) First edition. The Chess Review was a monthly magazine which started in 1933. The cover of the first issue featured a chess problem composed by Otto Wurzburg (1875 1951), a Grand Rapids, Michigan, postal worker. Kashdan was one of the world's premier problem solvers of the 1920s and 1930s. His interest in compositions influenced the magazine for years after he left, and the cover would feature a chess problem every issue until May 1941. Wurzburg served as problem editor and contributed a monthly column. The magazine staff also included art director Bertram Kadish who contributed cartoons and illustrations. An unusual feature of the first issue was a bridge column written by George Reith. Horowitz and Reinfeld were contract bridge devotees, but the column was dropped after three issues. The first editors were Isaac Kashdan (1933-1934); Israel Albert Horowitz (1935-1969). Volume 1, number 7-8 were not published, a book of the Folkestone International Team Tournament was produced in their stead. Co-editors include Kenneth Harkness, Jack Straley Battel. Merged with Chess Life in 1969. Condition: Corners bumped, spine sunned, spine ends and corners moderately rubbed, some stains to covers. About a very good copy lacking jacket.
book (2)

Painting Texas History to 1900

Sam DeShong Ratcliffe (1952- ) xlx+140 pages with frontispiece, color plates, photographs, illustrations, bibliography and index. Quarto (11 1/4" x 8 1/2") bound in original publisher's dark blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. First edition. Dramatic historical events have frequently provided subject matter for artists, particularly in pre-twentieth-century Texas, where works portraying historical, often legendary, events and individuals predominated. Until now, however, these paintings of Texas history have never received the kind of study given to historical, fictional, and film versions of the same events. Painting Texas History to 1900 fills this gap with an interdisciplinary approach that explores these paintings both as works of art and as historical documents. The author examines the works of more than forty artists, including Henry McArdle, Theodore Gentilz, Robert Onderdonk, William Huddle, Frederic Remington, Friedrich Richard Petri, Arthur T. Lee, Seth Eastman, Sarah Hardinge, Frank Reaugh, W. G. M. Samuel, Carl G. von Iwonski, and Julius Stockfleth. He places each work within its historical and cultural context to show why such subject matter was chosen, why it was depicted in a particular way, and why such a depiction gained popular acceptance. For example, paintings of heroic events of the Texas Revolution were especially popular in the years following the Civil War, when, in Ratcliffe's view, Texans needed such images to assuage the loss of the war and the humiliation of Reconstruction. Though the paintings cut across traditional art history categories—from the pictographs of early historic Indians to European-inspired oil paintings—they are bound together by their artists' intent for them to function as historically evocative documents. With their visual narratives of events that characterized all of America's westward expansion—Indian encounters, military battles, farming, ranching, surveying, and the closing of the frontier—these works add an important chapter to the story of the American West. Condition: Near fine in like jacket.
Aristotle and the American Indians–A Study in Race Prejudice in the Modern World

Aristotle and the American Indians–A Study in Race Prejudice in the Modern World

Lewis Hanke (1905–1993) x+164 pages with frontispiece, facsimiles and index. Octavo (8 3/4" x 5 1/2") bound in original publisher's black cloth with gilt lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. First edition. This painstakingly researched small volume recounts the Spaniards’ dealings with the people they encountered in the New World. The events that Lewis Hanke describes surround a formal debate in Spain during 1550 and 1551. On one side the scholar Juan Gines de Sepulveda argued for Aristotle’s doctrine of natural slavery: “that one part of mankind is set aside by nature to be slaves in the service of masters born for a life of virtue free of manual labor.” Sepulveda argued that the Indians of the New World were obviously natural slaves. The Spanish explorers, missionaries, and conquistadors should therefore use all means possible to subdue and enslave the Indians, he said. No form of brutality was inappropriate. Sepulveda’s opponent was a priest who had spent nearly 50 years in the Americas. Father Bartholome de Las Casas not only rejected the Aristotelian doctrine of natural slavery. He argued eloquently that the Indians of the Americas were people of language, culture, and sensible government who should be treated with respect and only brought to Catholicism and Spanish citizenship through education and peaceful persuasion. He deplored the violence perpetrated against them and their enslavement. A panel of judges failed to reach consensus about the winner of the debate, and the question lingered until 1573 when Spain enacted laws favoring Las Casas’s point of view. However, the distance between the Spanish court and the New World resulted in continued brutality against the Indians and continued slavery. Condition: Previous owner's name struck through on front end paper. Jacket: Spine sunned with ends chipped and rubbed, edge wear, some tears to jacket and abrasion to front where sticker removed else very good in a good to very good jacket.
The Maxwell Land Grant

The Maxwell Land Grant

Jim Berry Pearson xiv+305 pages pictorial title, maps, plates, figures, bibliography and in index. Royal octavo (9 1/4" x 6 1/4") bound in original publisher's brown cloth with dark brown lettering to spine in original pictorial jacket. From the library of Professor Donald Worcester. First edition. The Maxwell Land Grant, also known as the Beaubien-Miranda Land Grant, was a 1,714,765-acre (6,939.41 km2) Mexican land grant in Colfax County, New Mexico and part of adjoining Las Animas County, Colorado. This 1841 land grant was one of the largest contiguous private landholdings in the history of the United States. The New Mexico towns of Cimarron, Colfax, Dawson, Elizabethtown, French, Lynn, Maxwell, Miami, Raton, Rayado, Springer, Ute Park and Vermejo Park, came to be located within the grant, as well as numerous other towns that are now ghost towns. (Wikipedia). Donald E. Worcester (1915-2003) was an American historian who specialized in Southwestern United States and Latin American history. He was president of the Western History Association from 1974-1975. Worcester graduated from Bard College in 1939. He received an M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1941. He then served in the US Naval Reserve in World War II. He received a PhD. from Berkeley in 1947. From 1947 until 1963 he was a professor at the University of Florida. He then was a professor at Texas Christian University and history department chair. From 1960 until 1965 he was managing editor of the Hispanic American Historical Review. Worcester's view that history is made of complexities, not dualities, is seen as foundational for much of the understanding by later scholars of Southwest United States history. Condition: Worcester's stamp to front end paper. Corners bumped. Jacket Spine ends and corners lightly rubbed and chipped else very good in like jacket.
Chess Player's Chronicle Volume IV (4) New Series

Chess Player’s Chronicle Volume IV (4) New Series

Arthur Bolland Skipworth (1830-1898) assisted by William Wayte and Charles Ranken viii+384+[4 supplement] pages with diagrams, tables and index. Small Octavo (7 1/2" x 4 3/4") bound in half leather with gilt lettering to spine and fillets to corners and edge over black cloth boards. Volume Third Series Volume IV (4) New Series. From the library of Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer. (Betts: 7-1) First edition. he Chess Player's Chronicle, founded by Howard Staunton and extant from 1841-56 and 1859-62, was the world's first successful English-language magazine devoted exclusively to chess. Various unrelated but identically or similarly named publications were published until 1902. The earliest chess magazine in any language was the French Le Palamede, published in 1836-39 and 1842-47. In 1837 George Walker introduced an English-language magazine, the Philidoria, that was devoted to "chess and other scientific games". Only six issues of it were published, and it "expired in May, 1838". In 1840 or 1841 Staunton bought the fortnightly magazine The British Miscellany and Chess Player's Chronicle. In 1841 it became The Chess Player's Chronicle. In 1843, the Chess Player's Chronicle became a shilling monthly magazine. Staunton "made the inclusion of a large number of games by himself and other leading players of the day a special feature" of the magazine. He also used the magazine as a forum for attacking others. Staunton was the owner and editor of the magazine until the early 1850s, when he sold it to R.B. O'Brien. O'Brien became editor of the magazine, but was unable to continue its success and discontinued it in 1856 because of financial losses and his own illness. It reappeared in 1859 under the editorship of Ignatz Kolisch, Zytogorski, and Josef Kling, but survived only until July 1862. Thereafter, a number of magazines appeared with the same or similar name (such as Chess Players' Chronicle) appeared. Arthur Skipworth, assisted by William Wayte and Charles Ranken, wrote The Chess Players' Quarterly Chronicle, which was published in York from February 1868 to December 1871. Skipworth, who had left Bilsdale for Tetford Rectory, Horncastle, and John Wisker became the editors of the new The Chess Players' Chronicle in February 1872. Johann Lowenthal began writing for it in 1873. The magazine ran until 1875. In January 1876, it was succeeded by The Chess Player's Chronicle, whose editor-in-chief was J. Jenkin of Helensburgh. Its editorial staff consisted of Jenkin, Skipworth, Ranken, Wayte, and Andrew Hunter of Glasgow. Billed as a "monthly record of provincial chess", it was published at Glasgow, costing sixpence. Its short run under Jenkin's editorship was marked by xenophobia. The February issue stated that the West End Club had "cleared away the disturbing foreign element which infected the Divan" and referring to Wilhelm Steinitz as "the hot-headed little Austrian". Its third and last issue was published in March. The magazine reappeared in January 1877. It was now under Ranken's editorship, assisted by J. Crum, G. B. Fraser, Skipworth, and Wayte. The first issue apologized for "certain offensive statements and insinuations, seriously affecting the honor of some eminent players", and explained that some members of the present editorial staff had only contributed games and other inoffensive material to it in 1875. Ranken continued to edit the magazine until September 1880. In 1881, the title was enlarged to The Chess Player's Chronicle, and Journal of Indoor and Outdoor Sports, and "the magazine's importance in the chess world was no longer the same". None of these magazines compared in quality with what Staunton had achieved, and the success of the British Chess Magazine, by the turn of the century a superb magazine, put an end to the title in 1902. Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer (1872-1953) was an American businessman and philanthropist. He was originally from Cedar Falls, Iowa where he was born and educated. His occupational field was pharmaceuticals. Pfeiffer was at the same time a serious collector of chessmen and chess related material lie donated his entire collection of chessmen to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1952/53 ). He also donated over a hundred chess books to the New York Public Library which now make up the Frank J. Marshall Collection of Chess books. Among his donations to the N.Y.P.L. were 7 scrapbooks which contained manuscript material on chess and on famous chessmasters. Pfeiffer was also a member of the board of governors and a former vice-president of the Marshall Chess Club in New York. He died in New York City at the age of 81. Condition: Pfeiffer's book plate to front paste down. Spine ends taped and front hinge cracked, rubbed and chipped, some foxing to early preliminary pages, corners bumped and rubbed else good to very good.
The Chess Player's Chronicle: (New Series) Volume III 1879

The Chess Player’s Chronicle: (New Series) Volume III 1879

Charles Edward Ranken (1828-1905) editor with G B Fraser, A B Skipworth, H J C Andrews, W Wayte, W T Pierce iv+288 pages with diagrams, tables and index. Octavo (8 1/4" x 5 1/2") bound in green pebbled cloth boards gilt lettering to spine. Volume Volume III (3) New Series New Series. (Betts: 7-1) First edition. The Chess Player's Chronicle, founded by Howard Staunton and extant from 1841-56 and 1859-62, was the world's first successful English-language magazine devoted exclusively to chess. Various unrelated but identically or similarly named publications were published until 1902. The earliest chess magazine in any language was the French Le Palamede, published in 1836-39 and 1842-47. In 1837 George Walker introduced an English-language magazine, the Philidoria, that was devoted to "chess and other scientific games". Only six issues of it were published, and it "expired in May, 1838". In 1840 or 1841 Staunton bought the fortnightly magazine The British Miscellany and Chess Player's Chronicle. In 1841 it became The Chess Player's Chronicle. In 1843, the Chess Player's Chronicle became a shilling monthly magazine. Staunton "made the inclusion of a large number of games by himself and other leading players of the day a special feature" of the magazine. He also used the magazine as a forum for attacking others. Staunton was the owner and editor of the magazine until the early 1850s, when he sold it to R.B. O'Brien. O'Brien became editor of the magazine, but was unable to continue its success and discontinued it in 1856 because of financial losses and his own illness. It reappeared in 1859 under the editorship of Ignatz Kolisch, Zytogorski, and Josef Kling, but survived only until July 1862. Thereafter, a number of magazines appeared with the same or similar name (such as Chess Players' Chronicle) appeared. Arthur Skipworth, assisted by William Wayte and Charles Ranken, wrote The Chess Players' Quarterly Chronicle, which was published in York from February 1868 to December 1871. Skipworth, who had left Bilsdale for Tetford Rectory, Horncastle, and John Wisker became the editors of the new The Chess Players' Chronicle in February 1872. Johann Lowenthal began writing for it in 1873. The magazine ran until 1875. In January 1876, it was succeeded by The Chess Player's Chronicle, whose editor-in-chief was J. Jenkin of Helensburgh. Its editorial staff consisted of Jenkin, Skipworth, Ranken, Wayte, and Andrew Hunter of Glasgow. Billed as a "monthly record of provincial chess", it was published at Glasgow, costing sixpence. Its short run under Jenkin's editorship was marked by xenophobia. The February issue stated that the West End Club had "cleared away the disturbing foreign element which infected the Divan" and referring to Wilhelm Steinitz as "the hot-headed little Austrian". Its third and last issue was published in March. The magazine reappeared in January 1877. It was now under Ranken's editorship, assisted by J. Crum, G. B. Fraser, Skipworth, and Wayte. The first issue apologized for "certain offensive statements and insinuations, seriously affecting the honor of some eminent players", and explained that some members of the present editorial staff had only contributed games and other inoffensive material to it in 1875. Ranken continued to edit the magazine until September 1880. In 1881, the title was enlarged to The Chess Player's Chronicle, and Journal of Indoor and Outdoor Sports, and "the magazine's importance in the chess world was no longer the same". None of these magazines compared in quality with what Staunton had achieved, and the success of the British Chess Magazine, by the turn of the century a superb magazine, put an end to the title in 1902. Condition: Spine ends chipped and exterior hinge cracked, rubbed and chipped, book plate and stamp "British Chess Magazine" to front pastedown, corners bumped and rubbed through else good.