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Squadron 303: The Story of The Polish Fighter Squadron with the R. A. F.

Fiedler, Arkady. Octavo, blue cloth (hardcover), silver letters and stamped decoration to upper cover, 182 pp. Very Good, in a Very Good, mylar protected dust jacket. From dust jacket: In a letter to General Sikorski, dated September 16th, 1942, Mr. Churchill wrote: The Royal Air Force, whose opinion is not without value, are unanimous in presenting the laurel wreath to the Polish Air Force." The British Air Ministry in a communique on the Dieppe raid, in August 1942, siad, "The famous Warsaw Squadron (Kosciuszko Squadron, 303) of the Polish Air Force which destroyed 126 aircraft in the Battle of Britain was top scorer in the Battle of Dieppe." Speaking to War Correspondents on the Libya front, British Vice-Air Marshall Cunningham said: Polish pilots have only two speeds: top speed and full speed. They are wonderful. Their sole interest in life is to kill Germans. I have asked for three Poles for every squadron." British Air Minister, Sir Archibald Sinclair, wrote to General Sikorski in June 1942: Polish crews to the number of one hundred and one took part in the large scale operations on Cologne and the Ruhr. The Royal Air Force has learned to admire the valor, tenacity and efficiency of its Polish Allies. In these operations again they have shown how admirable is their contribution, in support of our common cause, to the destruction of our enemy. We are grateful to you and to Poland for these redoubtable squadrons." Speaking in the House of Lords on December 15, 1942, Lord Elgin paid a high tribute to Poland's Avenging Eagles and to the famous Kosciuszko Squadron No. 303. He said: Repeatedly we have heard of that Polish Fighter Squadron which knows no danger and has a record equal to that of any Royal Air Force Squadron's achievement. Aviation, Military History, World War II, WWII. nslic
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B-24 Liberator at War.

Freeman, Roger. Quarto, blue boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 128 pp. Near-Fine, with bookplate, in a Near-Fine dust jacket. From dust jacket: The theme of Liberator at War is evocation: an attempt through reference to the aircraft's peculiar qualities to illuminate the individuality of the type. Contributions from men associated with the Liberator during hostilities are used to futher this goal, for in their recollections can be found much that has a direct bearing on the nature of the beast. Additionally, the author concentrates on historical high points and certain aspects of the Liberator's war service that have hitherto received little publicity and does not attempt to cover the complex development history already investigated in other publications. The most widely used four-engined aircraft of World War 2, the Liberator served the Allied cause well in a number of roles. It was, without doubt, one of the most versatile types in their inventory and was to be seen practially the world over in its heyday. Including varients, a total of 19,256 Concolidated B-24 Liberators were built -- a production figure greater than that of any other Allied heavy bomber of the period. Ubiquitous and making considerable contribution to victory, the Liberator should have emerged from the conflict as one of the most famous of warplanes. Bit its activities were eclipsed by the B-17 Flying Fortress -- which came to symbolise American air power -- and many ex-B-24 crewmen might feel disgruntled that the 'Fort' should get the glory when for them the 'Lib' was so obviously more worthy. In Liberator at War, Roger Freeman tries to set the record straight, covering the Liberator's numerous roles and theatres of operations by means of action photographs and first-hand accounts. Aviation, Military History, Aeronautics, Aircraft, Aeroplanes. BSLIC
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Epics of the Fighting R. A. F.

Gribble, Leonard R. Octavo, blue cloth (hardcover), 192 pp. Very Good, with bookplate, in a Good, mylar protected dust jacket with edgewear. From dust jacket: Men of every section of the combatant Air Services are represented in Mr. Gribble's new book on the Fighting R.A.F. There are the men of Coastal Command, Bomber Command, and Fighter command, the Air-Sea Rescue Service, the Fleet Air Arm, and the long "catafighters" who protect the Merchant Navy; those in land machines fighting in Western Euorpe and over the deserts of Africa, the jungles of Malaya, and the Arctic snows; those flying on great bombing raids to Germany and Italy or attacking the factories and airfields of occupied Europe; those flying defensively at night over British town and coutnryside, or offensively on intruder patrol; and the men in R.A.F. uniform who flew and fought with Soviet airmen over the tundras of Northern Russia. Typical of the spirit and determination makring every operation undertaken by the R.A.F. are those pilots who fly on the "Cripples Parade," and bring their crippled aircraft back to base -- somehow. The valiant airmen of Free Europe also have a place in this record, although most of them have to remain anonymous for fear of enemy reprisals on their relatives. With them fly those Americans who did not wait for Pearl Harbour. In this successor to his popular Heroes of the Fighting R.A.F., Mr. Gribble has produced an enthralling record of achievement and courage. It is a record of victory against odds, of success snatched often from te brink of disaster, but mainly it is a record of men -- young men frmo British homes in every corner of the earth, who go forth to grapple with destiny and achieve the seemingly impossible. Epic, indeed, are those achievements. Aviation, Military History, Royal Air Force, R. A. F. bslic
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Valley of the Shadow of Death: The Bomber Command Campaign, March – July 1943.

Phillips, J. Alwyn. Octavo, black cloth (hardcover), gilt letters, 544 pp + [64] pp Index. Near-Fine, with bookplate; in a Near-Fine, mylar protected dust jacket. From dust jacket: The Ruhr was the industrial heart of Hitler's Reich. From its factories and foundries flowed a stream of weapons feeding the battle fronts. To disrupt or destroy this industrial centre was vital to the Allied war effort. Between March and July 1943, a campaign was launched against the Ruhr, yet Bomber Command was ot permitted to neglect its other responsibilities of minelaying and disrupting the U-Boat fleet which was causing havoc on the Atlantic convoy routes. In the space of less than five months 1,045 bombers and 6,848 men were lost. They had flown into the Valley of the Shadow of Death -- and had not returned. J. Alwyn Phillips was a Halifax pilot during this period and in his retirement began a project to record the fates of his fellow crews. As well as compiling an exhaustive listing of crews, their aircraft and their fates, he has detailed all of Bomber Command's operations for this phase of the campaign including minor operations and minelaying sorties. The many first-hand accounts bring every aspect of bomber operations to life and include the little known stories of 'The Run Up the Road,' 'The Insterburg Incident' and the Gestapo agent 'The Captain' who was responsible for the capture of many Allied airmen. Drawing on official sources the author has brought together many loose ends to produce this definitive account of the campaign. Military History, Aviation, World War II, WWII, Royal Air Force. nslic
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A-20 Boston at War.

Hess, William N. Quarto, burgundy boards (hardcover), gilt letters, illustrated endpapers, 128 pp. Near-Fine, with bookplate; in a Fine, mylar protected dust jacket. From dust jacket: Although it never achieved the spectacular success of either the Mosquito or the Ju88, the basic design of the Douglas A-20 produced a fast, extremely rugged, versatile and dependable series of aircraft whose service in the later A-26 variant extended well beyond World War II. The original design was a Douglas-inspired private venture DB-7 whose performance and potential in 1939 attracted first the French and later the British. The British named all the light bomber versions of the A-20 Bostons and the night-fighter and night-intruder versions, Havocs. Later in the war the name Havoc was taken over by the Americans who used it to describe the light-bomber in service with the USAAF. The excellent operational performance of all variants of the A-20 led late in World War II to the development of the A-26 Invader which exceeded all its load carrying and performance requirements and would have been produced in vast numbers had the war not ended. As it was, the A-26 had the war not ended. As it was, the A-26 (re-designated B-26 in 1948) remained in front line service with the USAF until the late 1960s by which time it had added Korea and Vietnam to its battle honours. In this book American aviation specialist William Hess, himself a veteran airman of World War II, tells the story of this remarkable series of aircraft in the words of the crews who flew them in action and in a new selection of photographs many of which have not been published before. It makes a fitting addition to this highly successful Ian Allan series. Aviation, Military History, Aeronautics, Airplanes, Aeroplanes, Air Planes. zslic
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Spitfire: A Complete Fighting History.

Price, Alfred. Quarto, full-color photos. illus. boards (hardcover), 301 pp. Former-owner bookplate, otherwise Fine; in a Fine dust jacket. From dust jacket: The Spitfire was the most famous aircraft ever to serve in the Royal Air Force. It remained in production for twelve years which bracketted the hardest-fought and technically most innovatory war in history. When the last one rolled off the production line more than twenty-two thousand had been built. Never before, and rarely since, has an airframe design been so successfully, continuously, aggresively and thoroughly developed. At the end of its development life the Spitfire carried an engine giving more than twice the power and weighing about three-quarters more than the original, had its maximum speed increased by a quarter, its rate of climb almost doubled, its maximum take-off weight more than doubled and its fire-power increased by a factor of five. The Spitfire was unsurpassed as an air-superiority fighter for most of the nine years following its first flight and remained in front-line service in the Royal Air Force foa further nine years after that. In this book, for the first time ever, Alfred Price has made an objective analysis of the Spitfire legend. The result is a unique account which casts new light not only on the Spitfire, but also on the nature of air combat during the Second World War. If you flew Spitfires or serviced them, or even fought against them, or if you wish to learn what it was like to have done these things, then this is the book for you. Aviation, Military HIstory, World War II, WWII. bslic
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The King’s Road to Florida: The Stagecoach Route.

Bockelman, Charles W. Quarto, paperbound (stiff, yellow textured stapled wrappers), 73 p. Very Good, with soiling to covers; interior clean and tight. This account of the King's Road is in part from the findings of Charles W. Bockelman, New Smyrna Beach, Florida, in his "Gems of History at La Cruz." From Foreword: During the British occupation of Florida, a road was constructed giving overland communication from St. Augustine to the British colonies north of the St. Mary's River and to the Turnbull settlement of New Smyrna to the south. Interestingly enough, a survey of a grant given in the second Spanish occupation of Florida shows a road (camino grande) in the southern part of the settlement. After the United States obtained control of Florida, the King's Road, then overgrown, was reopened. The bridges and causeways were rebuilt and surveys were made to the southernmost tip of the State. With the removal of the Indians from Florida to Oklahoma, the Road was extended to Cape Florida at the south end of the State. Through the years, the original alignment of this main north-south artery of travel has in many places been obliterated by urban development, and the route altered due to highway modernization. Most of the King's Road, however, still exists. Parts of it are overlaid with moder-day highway, some of it is still being used as rural unpaved road, and several miles of the road have been realigned, and are unpaved, and some ofthis realigned part is improved. Some sections may be illegally blocked off by owners of the lands through which the road runs, and the public may have a vested interest therein. It was not until the Twentieth Century, with the expansion of automobile travel and the fame of Florida's climate, that improved modern highways were contemplated and built in Florida. Until then, the old King's Road was the main and ONLY highway along the east coast of the State. Florida, Floridiana, Florida History, Transportation, American History, U. S. History, U.S.-iana, Americana. aslic
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B-57 Canberra at War, 1964 – 1972.

Mikesh, Robert C. Quarto, black boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 160 pp. Near-Fine, with bookplate; in a Fine, mylar protected dust jacket. From dust jacket: As the author says in his introduction, 'My first glimpse of the Canberra was the classic photo of it in a steeply banked turn at the introductory show at Farnborough in 1949. My reaction after disbelief was relief -- that this was not a USAF plane that I might one day have to fly. To me, its straight, wide and stubby wings looked totally antiquated. How quickly we change, for in a short time I was waiting anxiously for our unit to be equipped with the American-built version of this bomber, and from the first time I flew the B-57, I was hooked on it forever. Time has proved that the straightforward design was correct, for at this writing, the basic airframe design has been in continuous service for 30 y3ars. As the immortal DC-3 is the great workhorse of the air transports, the Canberra will certainly occupy a similar niche in history among combat aircraft. Although the British-built Canberra has had nearly 30 years of service with the Royal Air Force, it has seen little warlike action. Its potential as a warplane -- rarely doubted by its RAF crews -- was thoroughly vindicated by its American cousin in a dramatic reversal of the experience of an earlier generation of famous aircraft built in America and taken into combat by the RAF. In this latest addition to the Ian Allan series of at War books, pride of place has naturally gone to the B-57 variant. This in no way diminishes the importance or value of the Canberra B2, B(I)8, PR7 or any other mark of the design. They have made a major contribution to the readiness and ability of the Royal Air Force to react to Soviet aggression and hence to the effectiveness of the Western deterrent as a whole. Aviation, Aeronautics, Aeroplanes, Airplanes, Air Planes. zslic
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Custer and His Wolverines: The Michigan Cavalry Brigade 1861 – 1865.

Longacre, Edward G. Octavo, black boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 352 pp. Very Good, with neat former-owner inscription; in a Very Good, mylar protected dust jacket with very slight rubbing to edges. From dust jacket: U. S. Cavalry general George Armstrong Custer has gained last fame for his Indian campaigns and his "last stand" with the 7th Cavalry at the Little Bighorn. The youthful general also had a distinguished career during the preceding Civil War, where he first began to gain a reputation for daring operations. Custer's first command was not with the 7th Cavalry or, indeed, any Regular ARmy unit. Unexpectedly promoted to brigadier general on the eve of the battle of Gettysburg, Custer took command of the volunteers of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade. The Brigade had its origins in the 1st Michigan Cavlary, a volunteer unit that was raised and rushed to the defense of Washington in the summer of 1861. The 1st Michigan's distinguished record led to the formation of three more Michigan cavalry regiments for service in the East. The 7th Michigan would back up the 1st as a mounted shock unit, whiule the 5th and 6th Michigan Cavalry would be trained to dismount and provide supporting fire with their special-issue Spencer rifles. The four Michigan regiments were united in a single brigade in late 1862, initially under General Joseph T. Copeland. The MichiganCavalry Brigade suffered the heaviest casualties of any Union cavalry unit in the Civil War. Best-known for its flamboyant commander, the Brigade played a central role in many of the Civil War's most crucial bettles from the Shenandoah to Appomattox, and especially at Gettysburg. Civil War, Military History, War between the States, War of Rebellion, United States History, U. S. History, U.S.-iana, Americana, American History. yslic
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Avenger at War.

Tillman, Barrett. Quarto, blue boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 128 pp. Near-Fine, with bookplate, in a Fine, mylar protected dust jacket. From dust jacket: Few people, not even those who flew it and loved it, would claim the Avenger was the best aircraft of World War II. It was overly heavy, burdened with excess equipment it seldom used, and underpowered. But despite its shortcomings, 10,000 were produced between 1942 - 1945 -- more than any other US Navy aircraft except the Corsair and Hellcat -- the British Fleet Air Arm had 14 squadrons of them -- called Tarpons until 1944 -- and New Zealand took a number. As a weapons' platform the Avenger was supremely adaptable, able to carry bombs, torpedoes, rockets and depth charges, functioning as dive bomber, torpedo bomber, day bomber, night bomber (and even, when flown by Charles Henderson, as an interceptor!); they had a great range capabilibty, often more than their accompanying fighter cover, and they were, above all, rugged, able to sustain damage and yet still get home. No wonder then that Avengers were found from Midway to Guadalcanal, Saigon to Tokyo, Morocco to Normandy and that they helped destroy 60 Japanese warships. But with all the varieties of missions and locales, the Avenger's greatest contribution was undoubtedly in the Atlantic where its role in defeating the U-boat wolfpacks was an important factor in winning thw ar in Europe. While other aircraft played prominent parts in the anti-submarine campaign, none of them performed such a variety as well as the Avenger -- detecting, stalking, killing and discouraging U-boats by day and night. Avenger at War portrays this adaptable aircraft in all its guises, under all its flags. I does so with over 150 action photographs and a wealth of personal experiences and eyewitnesses accounts of Avenger fighting. Aviation, Military History, Aeroplanes, Air Planes, Airplanes, Aeronautics. bslic
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Hampden Special.

Bowyer, Chaz. Quarto, full-color photo. illus. boards (hardcover), 64 pp. Former-owner bookplate; otherwise, Fine. From Introduction: In September 1939 RAF Bomber Command was in a transitional stage of development. Though merely three years old as an entity, the command was already seeking a massive bomber potential. Existing first-line aircraft in its squadrons were all twin-engined, medium range bombers awaiting eventual replacement by promised four-engined heavy bombers, such as the Short Stirling and Handley Page Halifax. Three major designs represented the RAF's bomber spearhead then -- the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley, Vickers Armstrong Wellington, and the subject of this book, the Handley Page Hampden. All were at least six years old in concept; none was fully capable of delivering a sifnificant bomb load over any worthwile range of operations across Europe. And each was conceived originally in a contemporary climate of higher Service opinion that defensively-armed bombers could carry out daylight sorties without any need forr ancillary protection by escort fighters. When it first appeared the Hampden marked a considerable advance on existing RAF bomber designs. Long experienced in the manufacture of heavy bombers, the firm of Handley Page had finally rejected the biplane era in favour of all-metal monoplane projects. However, unlike its contemporary the immortal WEllington, the Hampden for all its bold unorthodoxy had -- to use a modernism -- built-in obslescence. Its fuselage construction and general layout left no room (literally) for further development. At the time this was not too important because plans for heavier replacement types of bomber were already in being. Unfortunately for the RAF, the Bomber Command in particular, World War 2 began before such replacements were anywhere near ready for issue to the squadrons. Thus the Hampden and its contemporaries, despite their age and near-obsolence, became vital weapons in the command's armoury. That they 'held the fort' for the first two years of war operations until the arrival of the next generation of bombers, and then continued to give stalwart service in other spheres of operations is a remarkable tribute to their basic designs. IT was no less a tribute to te crews who had to implement out-dated tactical and strategic policies in aircraft mainly unsuited to their given tasks. It should never be fortotten that the finest aircraft design is little more than a neat, expensive heap of sophisticated metallugy without the vital spark of the men who fly and operate it. If this survey of the Hampden is of any value in paying an overdue accolade to the Hampden crews, it will have served its chief purpose. For this reason the bulk of my text is deliberately biased towards the operational use of the Hampden, the deeds it accomplished -- and most especially, the men who performed those deeds. With the wealth of pure technical data already published and/or readily available to the aviation archivist, I have included here simply the more important basic dat=a of production and flying performance. The few published accounts of Hapdens and their operational usage which have appeared to date have been, in the main, condensed versions. Perhaps this broader account will help to balance the record. Aviation, Aircraft, Aeronautics, Aeroplanes, Air Planes. bslic
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The Sunland Tribune, Journal of the Tampa Historical Society: Volume XVII, November 1991.

VanLandingham, Kyle S.; Editor. Quarto, paperbound (stiff, b&w photo. illus. wrappers), 92 pp. Very Good, with light rubbing to covers. Contents: DeSoto Oak, Tampa University Facad, Sketch by Will K. Hagerman; Poised for the Future, by George B. Howell, III, President, Tampa Historical Society; Tampa's Forgotten Defenders: The Confederate Commanders of Fort Brooke, by Zack C. Waters; Tampa and the Coming of the Railroad, 1853-1884, by Canter Brown, Jr.; Profile of Capt. John Parker, by Spessard Stone; Profile of Lloyd Davis, by Spessard Stone; Tampa's Early Lighting and Transportation, by Arsenio M. Sanchez; The Fan: El Abanico, Ambassador or Love, by Tony Pizzo; Tampa's Great Fourth of July Celebration, by Tony Pizzo; Tampa's Great Fourth of July Celectration, by Tony Pizzo; The Damnedest Town This Side of Hell: Tampa, 1920-29 (Part II), by Dr. Frank Alduino; Babe Ruth and His Record Home Run at Tampa, by James W. Convington; Reminiscences of Tony Pizzo: The Sights, Sounds and Smells of Ybor City; A Synopsis of the Civil Rights Struggle in Tampa and the Role of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, by Robert W. Saunders; Spanish Lyric Theatre Celebrates Its 32nd Anniversary, by JoAnn Haskins Cimino; Oaklawn Cemetery Ramble; YMCA Time Capsule; Old Timers Reunion; 1991 D. B. McKay Award Winner; USF Professor Gary Mormino, by Hampton Dunn; Hampton Dunn Retires as Editor of Sunland Tribune, by Leland Hawes; Kyle VanLandingham New Editor of Sunland Tribune; Reminiscences of Capt. James McKay, Jr.; Meet the Authors; 1991 Sunland Tribune Patrons; Tampa Historical Society Roster of Members; "Benny Havens,: from the Tony PIzza Collection, USF. Florida, Floridiana, Florida History, Tampa, Hillsborough County, Americana. bslic